Prescott Valley Police Department

  • Agency: Prescott Valley Police Department
  • Address: 7601 E Civic Circle, Prescott Valley, 86314 AZ
  • Chief: Daniel R Schatz (Chief of Police)
Phone: 928-772-9261
Fax:
Email:

Prescott Valley Police Department is located at 7601 E Civic Circle, Prescott Valley, 86314 AZ. The Chief of Police of the department is Daniel R Schatz. The Prescott Valley Police Department phone number is 928-772-9261.

Prescott Valley Police Department News

The Prescott Valley Police Department will conduct written and physical testing for Recruit and Lateral police officers on Saturday, June 23, 2018. For information on time, place and requirements, please contact Sgt. Jason Kaufman at 928-772-5120 or email jkaufman@pvaz.net.

NAZ Suns donate proceeds of Salute to Heroes night to local law enforcement agencies, first responders and military The Northern Arizona Suns held a check presentation at the Prescott Valley Event Center June 12 to donate all proceeds raised from their inaugural Salute to Heroes Night. The NAZ Suns raised $7,520 for first responders and military in the quad-city area on March 24 by auctioning off specialty camouflage jerseys the team created and wore during their 2017-18 season finale. “Giving back to our community and investing in the quad-city area is so important to us,” Northern Arizona Suns Director of Business Operations Ashley Stovall said. “We were pleased to honor those who serve and protect our town and our country. Prescott Valley is a great place to live and we couldn’t imagine calling anywhere else home. We thank all of our first responders, military and everyone who contributed their time and resources into making this night a memorable one. The support of our fans is amazing and we look forward to many more great events.” Representatives from the Prescott Valley Police Department, Yavapai County Sherriff’s Office, Central Arizona Fire & Medical Authority, VFW Post 10227 and American Legion Post 140 all attended the presentation to each accept a share of the donation. In addition to the postgame auction of the specialty jerseys on March 24, the team held pregame events that included displays from/of helicopters, SWAT, K9 units, Fire Engine and patrol cars. Displays and representatives from Prescott Valley Police, Central Arizona Fire & Medical Authority, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Chino Valley Police, YCSO Jeep-Posse, Yavapai Tribal Police and the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office were in attendance.

NAZ Suns donate proceeds of Salute to Heroes night to local law enforcement agencies, first responders and military The Northern Arizona Suns held a check presentation at the Prescott Valley Event Center June 12 to donate all proceeds raised from their inaugural Salute to Heroes Night. The NAZ Suns raised $7,520 for first responders and military in the quad-city area on March 24 by auctioning off specialty camouflage jerseys the team created and wore during their 2017-18 season finale. “Giving back to our community and investing in the quad-city area is so important to us,” Northern Arizona Suns Director of Business Operations Ashley Stovall said. “We were pleased to honor those who serve and protect our town and our country. Prescott Valley is a great place to live and we couldn’t imagine calling anywhere else home. We thank all of our first responders, military and everyone who contributed their time and resources into making this night a memorable one. The support of our fans is amazing and we look forward to many more great events.” Representatives from the Prescott Valley Police Department, Yavapai County Sherriff’s Office, Central Arizona Fire & Medical Authority, VFW Post 10227 and American Legion Post 140 all attended the presentation to each accept a share of the donation. In addition to the postgame auction of the specialty jerseys on March 24, the team held pregame events that included displays from/of helicopters, SWAT, K9 units, Fire Engine and patrol cars. Displays and representatives from Prescott Valley Police, Central Arizona Fire & Medical Authority, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Chino Valley Police, YCSO Jeep-Posse, Yavapai Tribal Police and the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office were in attendance.

The bright spots in a police officer's day...Officers Jeremy Whisenand and Justin Ellison recently stopped into the Happy Parrot to answer some questions about the PV K9s and the PV Police Foundation, and Officer Ellison got to make the acquaintance of this colorful parrot. In the second photo, Officer Cameron Kinsey supports this young lady in her efforts to raise money for a mission trip. If you see a PV Officer out and about this weekend, smile and say hello - they love people, and parrots!

Council honors Deputy Police Chief James Edelstein for 20 years of service Prescott Valley Town Council and Police Chief Bryan Jarrell honored Deputy Chief James Edelstein during Thursday's Council meeting for his 20 years of service to the community. Born and raised in Phoenix, James moved to Yavapai County in 1994 to start his career in law enforcement. He worked for the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office first as a Detention Officer for a year before becoming a Deputy Sheriff, where he was assigned to Bagdad for about three years. He began working for the Prescott Valley Police Department in 1998 and has held numerous positions over the past 20 years, including Patrol Officer, Master Patrol Officer, Corporal, Detective, Patrol Sergeant, Detective Sergeant, Northern Arizona Regional Training Academy (NARTA) Sergeant, Lieutenant, Commander, and Deputy Chief. He was the assistant team leader for the department’s SWAT team as well as Department Range Master for several years. James completed the Leadership in Police Organization's training from AZPOST’s Center for Leadership and Excellence in 2011 and graduated from the FBI National Academy in 2015. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice in 2017 and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Organizational Leadership through Fort Hays State University. He has received awards from Mother’s Against Drunk Driving and Trauma Intervention Personnel for his efforts in impaired driving enforcement and community service. James and his wife Sarah have been married for 25 years and have three sons, J.T., Jacob and Toby. They enjoy athletics, outdoor activities, hanging out together, and volunteering at Shop With a Cop and in their family match through Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters. James was instrumental in launching Bigs in Blue through Big Brothers Big Sisters, working in conjunction with Big Brothers Big Sisters that pairs law enforcement personnel with children in need of positive role models. Through his efforts nearly 50 individuals have stepped forward to help inspire tomorrow's youth throughout Yavapai County. Congratulations Deputy Chief James Edelstein and thank you for your exemplary service to the citizens of the Town of Prescott Valley!

Officer Kyle Hader receives promotion to rank of Sergeant Mayor Harvey Skoog swore in Kyle Hader at his new rank of sergeant during Thursday's Town Council meeting. Kyle began his career in law enforcement when he received his associate’s degree in the administration of justice from Yavapai College. He was offered a position as an unpaid reserve officer in 2010, and attended the Northern Arizona Regional Training Academy (NARTA), graduating in December of 2010. Kyle completed the Field Training Officer program while still working as an unpaid reserve officer. In June 2011 he was offered a full time position and began working as a patrol officer. Kyle quickly found his niche in traffic and specialized in DUI investigations. He became a drug recognition expert, is certified in advanced roadside impaired driving investigations, and is a phlebotomist who regularly draws blood for the department. Kyle has been on the SWAT team for five years and is currently the lead breacher. The new sergeant's recognitions include PVPD Rookie of the Year in 2011, PVPD Officer of the Year in 2014, Elks Lodge and VFW Officer of the Year in 2014, as well as the Mothers Against Drunk Driving Officer of the Year in 2013, 2014, and 2015. A Field Training Officer for four years, Kyle has trained numerous officers, including lateral officers who have come to Prescott Valley from other departments. He is a general instructor and weekly teaches physical fitness at NARTA. He was a Lead Police Officer prior to becoming a sergeant and was an acting sergeant for four months in 2017. Kyle is engaged to his fiancée Meagan, and they live in Prescott Valley with their three dogs. Along with Meagan, Kyle was joined for Thursday's ceremony by his parents, grandparents, and younger brother. Congratulations Kyle Hader on your promotion!

Prescott Valley Police Department Mission, Vision and Values There have been many changes in the last decade and a half in the Town of Prescott Valley. Since 2000 to 2017 the Town population grew from 20,000 to 44,000 residents. To provide homes for this population, multiple-thousands of houses have been constructed and many new streets have been added. The number of businesses has grown. The demographics of the community have changed as well. We are growing younger and more diverse. Just as the Town has grown, so has the Prescott Valley Police Department. In 2011 the Town’s population was just under 39,000 and the total staffing of the police department was 76, made up of 61 sworn personnel and 15 civilians. Today there are 100 employees, made up of 76 sworn personnel and 24 civilians. With the growth and changes in the community, Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell felt that it was time to revisit the mission, vision and values of his department. In order to accomplish this task, he involved all members of the department requesting their input in moving forward. After many meetings and discussions from each unit of the department, the following mission, vision and values have been established. Mission: It is the mission of the Prescott Valley Police Department to protect and preserve the rights of all people through impartial, courteous, and compassionate law enforcement. Vision: It is the vision of the Prescott Valley Police Department to evolve with our dynamic community, provide the highest level of service and safety to our deserving citizens, and collaborate with our community and regional partners to identify areas of needed improvement. We will accomplish this vision by providing our members with the tools and knowledge to meet the present and future needs of Prescott Valley within the scope of police services. Values: Professionalism – Conduct that reflects the specialized training and responsibility inherent in policing. Respect – Treat others as you would like to be treated in the same situation. Integrity – Always doing the right thing. Diversity – Accepting of and valuing differences. Excellence – Striving to always be the best through constant evaluation and improvement. Chief Jarrell asks the entire community to join the police department in assuring that its Mission, Vision, and Values are carried out to the fullest degree possible. Prescott Valley Police Department can be contacted at (928) 772-9267 for non-emergencies, 911 for emergencies.

Police are looking for these suspects

See Something - Say Something Our primary goal at the Prescott Valley Police Department is to encourage everyone to sharpen their awareness of their surroundings. Security is a shared responsibility and every citizen plays a critical role in identifying and reporting suspicious activities and threats. Suspicious activity is any observed behavior that seems out of place from what you see in your normal environment. This includes, but is not limited to: • Unusual items or situations: A vehicle is parked in an odd location; a package or luggage is unattended; a window or door is open that is usually closed; or other out-of-the-ordinary situations occur. • Eliciting information: A person questions individuals at a level beyond curiosity about a building’s purpose, operations, security procedures and/or personnel, shift changes, etc. • Observation or surveillance: Someone pays unusual attention to facilities or buildings beyond a casual or professional interest. This includes extended loitering without explanation (particularly in concealed locations); unusual, repeated, and/or prolonged observation of a building (e.g., with binoculars or video camera); taking notes or measurements; counting paces; sketching floor plans, etc. Some of these activities could be innocent – it's up to law enforcement to determine whether the behavior warrants investigation. You are encouraged to focus on a person’s behavior and not on a person’s race, gender, creed, or religion. Public safety is everyone's responsibility. If you see suspicious activity, report it to local law enforcement or a person of authority. Describe specifically what you observed, including: • Who or what you saw; • When you saw it; • Where it occurred; and • Why it's suspicious. We all play a role in keeping our community safe. Prescott Valley Police Department can be contacted at (928) 772-9267 for non-emergencies, 911 for emergencies.

Meaningful Contact: Community Service Officer meets needs of elderly woman after burglary Prescott Valley Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell encourages all employees of the police department to engage and interact with our citizens in meaningful ways to make a difference in the lives of Prescott Valley residents. Following each criminal event that occurs in Prescott Valley, Community Service Officer Bob Steward, one of the Department’s Victim Advocacy Representatives, makes follow up phone contacts with the victims to ascertain what their special needs might be as a result of the criminal activity. Recently an elderly woman’s home was burglarized and one of the items stolen was her sewing machine. When Steward made contact with the woman, he learned that she had a special attachment to the sewing machine and was heartbroken when it was taken. Steward shared this information with Community Service Officer Marie Yogerst, who then chose to donate her own personal sewing machine to the victim. On Thursday, June 7, 2018, they delivered the sewing machine to the victim who was overwhelmed with the thoughtfulness and kindness of the police personnel. This act of kindness again represents why Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell is so pleased with the level of compassion demonstrated by his personnel when relating to community members. Prescott Valley Police Department can be contacted at (928) 772-9267 for non-emergencies, 911 for emergencies.

Prescott Valley Police Chief Bryan Jarrell now has a Twitter account! Follow him @ChiefJarrell

The Prescott Valley Police Department will conduct written and physical testing for Recruit and Lateral police officers on Saturday, June 23, 2018. For information on time, place and requirements, please contact Sgt. Jason Kaufman at 928-772-5120 or email jkaufman@pvaz.net.

Prescott Valley Police Chief seeking Advisory Board members Prescott Valley Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell continues to seek residents who are interested in being members of the Police Advisory Board. This Board provides yet another avenue for information-sharing between the police department and the community it serves. The Board meets quarterly so citizens, business owners, and other stakeholders of Prescott Valley can share items of interest or concern with the police department. It not only allows an opportunity for the police department to address these public issues, it provides a chance to impart information so the community may better understand the role of law enforcement. Individuals from the following areas may write letters of interest to: Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell, 7601 E. Civic Circle, Prescott Valley, AZ 86314. • High School students • Parents of school students • Latino Community • Business owner or manager for both small and large organizations • Project Lifesaver • Senior community • Veterans • Mental health provider • Yavapai College • Northern Arizona University • Faith based Community • Media • MatForce • Elected official • Yavapai Regional Medical Center • Central Arizona Fire and Medical Authority • LGBTQ community Individuals selected will be notified regarding the next steps in the process. Prescott Valley Police Department can be contacted at (928) 772-9267 for non-emergencies, 911 for emergencies.

Prescott Valley Police Chief invites applications for advisory board Prescott Valley Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell is announcing the formation of a Police Advisory Board to provide yet another avenue for information-sharing between the police department and the community it serves. The goal of this Board will be to meet quarterly so citizens, business owners, and other stakeholders of Prescott Valley can share items of interest or concern with the police department. It will not only allow an opportunity for the police department to address these public issues, it will provide a chance to impart information so the community may better understand the role of law enforcement. At this time Prescott Valley Police Department is accepting letters of interest from individuals in the following areas to begin the formation of the Board: • Community volunteers • High School students • Parents of school students • Latino Community • Business owner or manager for both small and large organizations • Project Lifesaver • Senior community • Veterans • Mental health provider • Yavapai College • Northern Arizona University • Faith based Community • Media • MatForce • Elected official • Yavapai Regional Medical Center • Central Arizona Fire and Medical Authority Those interested in serving on this board may write a letter of interest to: Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell, 7601 E. Civic Circle, Prescott Valley, AZ 86314. Individuals selected will be notified regarding the next steps in the process. Prescott Valley Police Department can be contacted at (928) 772-9267 for non-emergencies, 911 for emergencies.

Warmer temperatures mean hot cars, and danger to pets left inside Temperatures in the Prescott Valley area are approaching the upper 80s and will soon be in the 90s and above as summer approaches. That means, unfortunately, that people’s dogs are more often in danger from being left in hot cars. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals states that in outdoor temperatures of 85 degrees, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of your car to reach 102 degrees. Within 30 minutes, a car’s interior temperature can climb from 85F to 120F. Cracking a window doesn’t help, because without a cool breeze, air doesn’t circulate. Prescott Valley Animal Control officers already have answered several calls this spring from concerned citizens who see animals locked in cars with the owner nowhere around. While Arizona law recently changed to protect those who break a window to free an animal they believe is in distress, PV ACO Supervisor James Risinger asks people to consider carefully before taking such an action. First and foremost, Risinger said, if you see an animal you believe is in distress, call 911. In Prescott Valley, if an Animal Control officer is not available, the police department will send an officer. He added that along with calling 911, people should exhaust all avenues to find the owner before doing something as drastic as breaking a window to free an animal. “Though the law protects you if an animal is in true distress, if you are wrong, you could be held liable,” he said. Dogs are naturally protective of a vehicle, and could perceive someone breaking a window as a threat, leading to a bite. Additionally, if the person freeing the animal has not thought how they will contain it, they can be faced with a loose dog that becomes lost or worse. “A trained Animal Control officer will know how to approach, free and contain an animal in distress. I always caution people that before they break a window to free an animal, they ask themselves if they have exhausted all resources available – have I called the police or the fire department? Checked surrounding areas for the owner?” he said. “If not, I seriously suggest you do not break that window.” Risinger also has a few words for dog owners, who may not realize a “quick” trip into a store may mean the end of their pet’s life. “The typical grocery shopping time is 15-45 minutes. Temperatures can skyrocket in a car in that time. The majority of time the owner never intended that, but they are not aware how quickly the temperature can change,” he said. “It’s better to leave your dog at home.” Reach the Prescott Valley Police Department at 928-772-9267 for non-emergencies and 911 in emergencies. Reach the Central Yavapai Fire and Medical Authority at 928-772-7711 in non-emergencies and 911 in emergencies.

The Prescott Valley Police Department team participated in the Relay for Life Friday night at the PV Civic Center. The team raised $1,812 for the American Cancer Society to assist those with cancer in their fight.