Santa Monica Police Department

  • Agency: Santa Monica Police Department
  • Address: 333 Olympic Drive, Santa Monica, 90401-2200 CA
  • Chief: Timothy Jackman (Chief of Police)
Phone: 310.395.9931
Fax:

Santa Monica Police Department is located at 333 Olympic Drive, Santa Monica, 90401-2200 CA. The Chief of Police of the department is Timothy Jackman. The Santa Monica Police Department phone number is 310.395.9931.

Santa Monica Police Department News

#OptimusCrime spent the day/night at Ocean & Colorado near the #SantaMonicaPier. #Officers conducted roll call meetings, wrote reports and deployed from the Mobile Station. This resulted in officers spending more time patrolling the local area. Stay tuned for more deployments aka #transformations in an area near you. #MoreThanMeetsTheEye

#OptimusCrime More than meets the eye! Transforming in a neighborhood near you. Stay tuned for more information.

On Tuesday, May 22, 2018, K9 Rambo officially retired! Rambo served the Santa Monica community faithfully for 5 years, first with Officer Roberto Villegas and then with Officer Lou Marioni. Rambo has walked the Red Carpet, met dignitaries and been a wonderful K9 ambassador to hundreds of Santa Monica school children. We want to wish Rambo all the best sunny spots and soft grass for play and naps in his retirement years.

LOST BUT NOT FORGOTTEN - Officer Derek Morton Officer Derek Morton, attended Whittier College, graduated cum laude, and was named the outstanding graduate in his department. His major was physical education, with concentrations in athletic training and pre-physical therapy. After years teaching water polo for the city of Santa Clarita; working as a physical trainer; and a motion-capture performer, he realized that his heart’s desire was to be a policeman. In 2002 Morton graduated in class number 153 from the Orange County Sheriff’s Academy, receiving the Communications Award. Immediately following graduation he was sworn into the Santa Monica Police Department. The year before his diagnosis he was advanced to the Vice and Narcotics Squad of SMPD. Following his first surgery and the beginning of chemo, he returned to work for about nine months – such was his love for his job and his colleagues. Officer Derek Morton lost his battle with metastatic colon cancer on August 14, 2010.

LOST BUT NOT FORGOTTEN Officer Raymond G. Fenochio began his law enforcement career as a Santa Monica College Police officer for a little over two years in the mid-1990s. He then joined the City of Santa Monica's Police Department. Officer Fenochio was awarded the department's Medal of Courage for rescuing a woman from the grips of her suicidal and armed boyfriend. The medal is given to those who display courage above and beyond the call of duty. Receiving the medal reflected Fenochio's character. Officer Ray Fenochio will never be forgotten. Instead, he will remain an example of a person who believed in the golden rule, who loved life and believed that the way you treat people, comes back to you. After years of aggressive treatments, Officer Ray Fenochio passed away from leukemia at the age of 31. End of Watch: February 24, 2001

Gone But Not Forgotten: Officer Mitch Kato Officer Kato joined the Army in 1974 and served four years in the Armored Division. Receiving an honorable discharge from military service, he was granted his U.S. citizenship in 1975. Kato joined the Santa Monica Police Reserve Officers Program in 1979 and became a Santa Monica police officer in 1980. He never stopped adding to his skills from becoming a 3rd degree black belt in karate and an instructor in Kendo to earning a private pilot's license, to becoming a first-rate photographer. He used his amazing range of talents while serving in many assignments: vice, motors, mounted patrol, Third Street Promenade bikes, and his final assignment, Police Activities League (PAL) Officer. Each job was handled with enthusiasm, diligence and caring.He used his fluency in Japanese in difficult times, helping patients in the emergency room and advocating for victims of crimes, "coming in at any hour to translate." He was described as a "genuine man" by his friends. All of his colleagues describe Mitch with similar words: a man of integrity, generosity and humility, warm and compassionate, who loved his job and "never raised his voice at another person." He is remembered as "one in a million one who was always joyful and wanted others to be happy too." Mitch saw himself not as a law enforcer, but as a peace officer whose duty was to protect and to serve the community. Officer Kato lost his life to a long battle with cancer. End of Watch: Dec 09, 1998

LOST BUT NOT FORGOTTEN The Santa Monica Police Department has lost three police officers to cancer while serving the Santa Monica Community. We would like to honor them for their service and commitment. Over the next three days, we will feature these brave men – Our Family, Lost But Not Forgotten.

Second Chance... Click It Or Ticket Memorial Day weekend is an unofficial start to the summer season and a busy time for Californians. Each year, the highways fill with families in vehicles, on their way to start their summer vacations. To help keep drivers and passengers safe, the Santa Monica Police Department (SMPD) is reminding motorists to Click It or Ticket. SMPD will deploy additional officers May 21- June 3, 2018 on special traffic patrols to stop and ticket both drivers and passengers for failing to use the vehicle’s safety belt restraints. This will also include drivers who fail to secure children in the proper child restraint seats. “If you know a friend or a family member who does not buckle up when they drive, please ask them to consider changing their habits,” said Chief Cynthia Renaud. “Help us spread this life-saving message before one more friend or family member is killed as a result of this inaction. Seat belts save lives, and everyone needs to remember to buckle up—every trip, every time.” According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, nearly half (48%) of the passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes in 2016 were unrestrained. At night from 6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m., that number soared to 56 percent of those killed resulting in a focus of the Click It or Ticket campaign to nighttime enforcement. Police, Sheriff and the CHP will be taking a no-excuses approach to seat belt law enforcement, writing citations day and night. In California, the minimum penalty for a seat belt violation is $162. “This Memorial Day period and, in fact, every day, we want everyone in every vehicle to remember that buckling up could be their greatest defense in a crash,” said Rhonda Craft, Director of the California Office of Traffic Safety. “Putting on a seat belt is one of the quickest, simplest and most effective ways to ensure you and your loved ones remain safe and sound on the road.” This enforcement effort is funded by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and remember - Report Drunk Drivers - call 911.

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK - HONORING SMPD'S FALLEN Officer Ricardo A. Crocker In service: 1995 -2005 Officer Ricardo Crocker was a 10 year veteran of the Santa Monica Police Department and a Marine Corps Reserve Major. Officer Crocker was killed by a rocket propelled grenade while on tour and in service to his country in Iraq on May 27, 2005. Officer Crocker held the rank of Captain in the United States Marines when he was hired by the police department and has since been promoted to the rank of Major. Crocker's last assignment with the Santa Monica Police Department was with the Police Activities League, where he helped procure computers for a program to help prepare students for their college entrance exam. His memory has been memorialized by dedicating the Santa Monica portion of the 10 freeway in his honor. Officer Crocker was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He was appointed as a police officer on July 21, 1995. Age: 39 End of Watch: May 27, 2005

Busy day for Chief Renaud. First a visit with residents at the Virginia Avenue Park - City of Santa Monica Coffee with a Cop event and now she's off to another community meeting.

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK - HONORING SMPD'S FALLEN Officer William Lee Davidson In service: 1966-1969 Officer William Lee Davidson was killed in a motorcycle accident. On the evening of August 21, 1969, Officer Davidson was training rookie Officer George M. Sennatt, Jr. on the operation of the department's three-wheeled motorcycle. During the training, Officer Davidson was involved in an accident causing him to be thrown several feet, rupturing his spleen. Officer Davidson succumbed to his injuries. Officer William Lee Davidson was a native of California. He was married and lived in Woodland Hills. He had been on the Santa Monica police force for three years. Age 31 End of Watch: August 21, 1969

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK - HONORING SMPD'S FALLEN Officer David L. Kohler In service: 1956 - 1960 Officer David Louis Kohler was killed in a motorcycle accident when a car pulled out in front of him while he was on patrol. Officer Kohler was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and had lived in the Santa Monica area for 14 years. He joined the Santa Monica Police Department on November 19, 1956 and became a motorcycle officer on January 5, 1959. Officer Kohler had served with the agency for 4 years. He was survived by his wife and three children. Age: 29 End of Watch: November 2, 1960

With gratitude, we bow our heads and remember those that have given the ultimate sacrifice. #NationalPoliceWeek2018 #WashingtonDC #NeverForgotten

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK - HONORING SMPD'S FALLEN Sergeant Ronald A. Wise In service: 1956 - 1965 Sergeant Ronald Wise was shot and killed as he attempted to arrest a man for child abuse. A patrol officer responded to a residence on Fourth Street to investigate a report of child abuse. When he arrived, he found a badly bruised and semi-conscious child. The officer requested that Sergeant Wise respond to the scene to assist in the arrest of the belligerent suspect. When Sergeant Wise arrived, the suspect shot him twice in the stomach. Other officers at the scene returned fire, and the suspect was eventually arrested following a short gun battle. Sergeant Wise was taken to Santa Monica Hospital where he died the next day from his wounds. The suspect was convicted of second degree murder, and served only seven years in prison. Following his release from prison he committed a second murder. He was returned to prison where he died while awaiting sentencing for the second murder. Sergeant Wise had served with the agency for nine years. He is survived by his wife and two daughters. Age: 33 End of Watch: November 4, 1965

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK - HONORING SMPD'S FALLEN Sergeant Rolland Morton In service: 1922- 1933 Sergeant Rolland Morton and Special Officer Frederick "Chicago" Porter were killed in an aircraft accident while en route to Long Beach to offer assistance to victims of a recent earthquake. They were accompanied by Airport Manager Charles V. Towns. The Chief of Police had also requested that they check on Santa Monica residents who were working at a Long Beach dredging company. When they reached the Baldwin Hills area, the landing gear of the low-flying airplane struck a small knoll, causing it to break up and burn. All three men were killed. Roland Carl Morton was born in Stewartsville, Missouri. He moved with his parents to Santa Monica about 1905. He was hired by the Santa Monica Police Department as a motorcycle officer on August 1, 1922 and was appointed acting patrol sergeant on January 5, 1932. He resided in Santa Monica. He was survived by his wife and three sons. Sergeant Morton had been with the agency for 11 years. Age: 38 End of Watch: March 10, 1933

Over the past few weeks, more than 7 catalytic converters have been stolen in the City of Santa Monica. While latest target has been the Toyota Prius, all vehicles made after 1975 are required by law to have a cat converter. To prevent catalytic converter theft, please follow these tips: 1. Always park in well-lit areas or within your garage if possible. 2. At shopping centers and other similar parking lots, park close to the entrance of the building or where there’s a lot of traffic. 3. Visit a local muffler shop and have the converter secured to the vehicle’s frame with a couple of pieces of hardened steel welded to the frame. 4. Check out the different types of catalytic converter theft deterrent systems at your local auto parts store or online. Remember... see something, say something. Please call 9-1-1 for a crime in progress or 310-458-8491 for our non-emergency dispatch to report a crime after the fact.

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK - HONORING SMPD'S FALLEN Special Officer Frederick C. Porter In Service: 1931-1933 Special Officer Frederick "Chicago" Porter and Sergeant Rolland Morton were killed in an aircraft accident while en route to Long Beach to offer assistance to victims of a recent earthquake. They were accompanied by Airport Manager Charles V. Towns. The Chief of Police had requested they check on Santa Monica residents who were working at a Long Beach dredging company. When they reached the Baldwin Hills area, the landing gear of the low-flying airplane struck a small knoll, causing it to break up and burn. All three men were killed. Reserve Officer Frederick Chicago Porter, who resided in Santa Monica, was survived by his wife and two sons. He was a native of Chicago, Illinois. Age: 36 End of Watch: March 10, 1933

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK - HONORING SMPD'S FALLEN Officer William Blackett In service: 1923 - 1927 Officer William Blackett was killed when his motorcycle crashed into an automobile ahead of him as it was turning a corner. Officer Blackett, along with another motorcycle patrolman, were pursuing a speeder on Pico Boulevard near 23rd Street when the accident occurred. Another car passed between the speeder and police vehicle, according to Chief Webb, and Officer Blackett collided with the other vehicle. Officer William Blackett was a native of Salt Lake City, Utah and a four-year veteran of the force. Age: 28 End of Watch: End of Watch: July 8, 1927

In 1962, President Kennedy proclaimed May 15th as National Peace Officers Memorial Day and the calendar week in which May 15th falls, as National Police Week. Established by a joint resolution of Congress in 1962, National Police Week pays special recognition to those law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others. SMPD would like to take this week to honor the officers that have given their lives for those in this community. This department will recognize the 7 officers lost in the line of duty with a daily post dedicated to each of these brave men.

Chief Cynthia Renaud was sworn in as the 17th Police Chief for Santa Monica PD on May 8th.

Join us for coffee and conversation!

MOTORCYCLE AWARENESS MONTH IN MAY In order to reduce motorcycle crashes and save lives, the Santa Monica Police Department and the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) are teaming up with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) this May for the annual Motorcycle Safety Awareness campaign to help save lives on our roadways. The awareness campaign aims to educate vehicle drivers and motorcyclists on how each motorist can be more aware of the other, creating safer roads and saving lives in the process. The Santa Monica Police Department will join law enforcement organizations throughout the state to step up enforcement along with awareness efforts to lower motorcycle deaths and injuries during the May campaign. Officers will have a special emphasis this month on enforcing all traffic violations by both drivers and cyclist deploying Saturation Patrols this afternoon, May 8, from 3PM until 9 PM.

The Santa Monica Police Department (SMPD) will be conducting a DUI/Driver’s License Checkpoint on Friday May 4, at an undisclosed location within the city limits between the hours of 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Funding for this checkpoint is provided to the Santa Monica Police Department by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, reminding everyone to ‘Report Drunk Driving – Call 9-1-1’.

Today, SMPD's Mobile Command Post aka #OptimusCRIME was out at Reed Park. We received tons of questions and thought that a quick video would be a great way to explain the purpose of the new program.

MURDER/ARSON ARREST Earlier this morning, Santa Monica Police Department (SMPD) Detectives filed charges on a suspect believed to be involved in an arson which led to the death of a residentin Santa Monica. The suspect is identified as Victoria Renae Darlington, a 26-year old female from Santa Monica. The charges were filed with the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office - Airport Division Courthouse. On May 1, 2018 at about 9:41 p.m., SMPD Officers responded to a radio call for service of a structure fire to a single-family residence in the 2600 block of 31st Street. Prior to police arrival, the Santa Monica Fire Department (SMFD) was notified and already on scene working to extinguish the fire to an attached garage. While on scene, an elderly resident was discovered unconscious in the house. The resident was treated at the scene by SMFD Paramedics and transported to a local hospital for treatment. Unfortunately, the victim succumbed to her injuries at the hospital a short time later. Following a preliminary investigation by SMPD and SMFD Arson Investigators, evidence and information was gathered indicating the fire was intentionally ignited. Darlington was identified as a primary suspect involved in the incident. Darlington was located and taken into custody in Riverside by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department. Darlington has been charged with 187(a) PC – Murder; and 451(b) PC – Arson to An InhabitedStructure. Darlington remains in custody with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office on a 2 million dollar bail pending future court proceedings. Anyone with information related to this investigation is encouraged to contact Detective Cooper (310) 458-8478; Detective Leone (310) 458-8949; or the Santa Monica Police Department at (310) 458-8491.