La Grange Park Police Department

  • Agency: La Grange Park Police Department
  • Address: 447 N. Catherine, La Grange Park, 60525 IL
  • Chief:

La Grange Park Police Department is located at 447 N. Catherine, La Grange Park, 60525 IL. The La Grange Park Police Department phone number is 708-352-7711.

La Grange Park Police Department News

Wednesday, November 15, 2017 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which takes place Wednesday, November 15 at 7:00 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Plymouth Place, 315 N. La Grange Road.

Building a Digital Defense Against Impersonation Scams Technical advice from the F.B.I. Officers, deputies and agents join law enforcement agencies to help protect the people they serve and to bring a sense of justice to our communities. However, when a scam artist exploits that relationship, he can destroy a person's trust in both law enforcement and government in general. These scams are easy and lucrative, and the results can be financially and emotionally devastating. According to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center, U.S. victims reported impersonation crimes more than 12,000 times in 2016, resulting in more than $12 million in losses. So how does it work? A fraudster calls, texts or e-mails you-pretending to be some kind of official from a local, state or federal agency. He tells you that you are in big legal trouble, and the only way out is for you to make a payment immediately. He will use social engineering tactics to stress you out in hopes of getting you to make a quick decision without thinking things through. Here are some examples of how this works: Say someone contacts you tomorrow claiming to be from the FBI. The fraudster may say he is calling on behalf of the Director's office or in the name of the local Special Agent in Charge. He may use the FBI seal or other graphics to make the communication look legit. He may even spoof-or copy-a local FBI phone number so it looks real. The caller will tell you that you are under investigation for some crime, but if you want to settle the matter immediately you can. If you don't -- then you could be arrested and anything you own will be confiscated. A similar variation involves jury duty scams. In this case, the scam artist pretends to be from the U.S. Marshals service or county judge's office. He says that you missed a recent summons to serve, and you now must pay a huge fine or risk jail. So how do you know who is real and who is not? Know that no law enforcement officer is going to ask you to pay up or provide personal information over the phone, by e-mail or by text. Here are some ideas on what you can do if you are contacted by someone suspicious: • Don't fall for high-pressure tactics. A legitimate officer or agent is not going to tell you that you have to pay "right this minute or else..." > Do not pay a government debt via pre-paid cards or wire transfers. Fraudsters will often ask for payment this way. • Ask to call the person back. Look up the number online yourself, and call to confirm whether the person is legitimate. We in the FBI get calls all the time from community members who say they are just checking back to see if a person who identified himself as an FBI agent is real. Oftentimes, they are not. We would much prefer you call to check before giving away money than after. • Do not give anyone financial or personal information unless you initiate the contact and are 100% confident about with whom you are talking. This includes your bank account, credit card and social security numbers. If you have been victimized by this scam or any other online scam, contact the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. Upcoming Events:

Helpful information from the Illinois Attorney General's Office: Violent crime is a senseless, often random act, and it is far too common in today's society. It is no longer enough to ensure that offenders receive the harshest punishment under the law. Victims and their families need support as they attempt to rebuild lives torn apart by tragedy. IAG Office has made it a priority to provide services to help victims meet their challenges and regain peace of mind. Programs administered by the Crime Victim Services Division include: • The Illinois Crime Victim Compensation Program provides direct financial assistance to innocent victims of violent crime to reimburse out-of-pocket expenses related to the crime. • The Domestic Violence Fund provides funding for legal advocacy, legal assistance, and legal services to victims of domestic violence who are or have been married or in a civil union. This fund is awarded from a portion of marriage license fees and a portion of civil union license fees. Any public or private not-for-profit agency that provides services to victims of domestic violence may apply to the Illinois Attorney General for funding from the Domestic Violence Fund. • The Violent Crime Victim Assistance (VCVA) Program provides grants to victim and witness assistance programs throughout the state. Here, you will find links to the Quarterly Report, Eligibility Requirements, List of Grantees, RFP Information, and Application Kits. • The Automated Victim Notification (AVN) System allows crime victims throughout Illinois to obtain timely and reliable information about criminal cases and the custody status of offenders 24 hours a day via telephone, Web, or e-mail. • The Statewide Victim Assistance Program provides services to crime victims and witnesses whose cases are prosecuted by the Office of the Attorney General, including Sexually Violent Persons petitions. The program is also available to the 102 state's attorneys across Illinois. • The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Program trains registered nurses and other professionals who treat and assist sexual assault patients to provide a higher level of care and reduce re-traumatization of victims. • The Illinois Victim Assistance Academy is a 40-hour intensive course of study for crime victim service providers and law enforcement personnel. The IVAA is designed to improve the quality and consistency of victim services in Illinois. • The Sexual Assault Incident Procedure Act: In 2016, Attorney General Madigan led an effort with the Cook County State's Attorney's Office, the St. Clair County State's Attorney's Office and the Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault to pass The Sexual Assault Incident Procedure Act. The law contains new requirements for law enforcement authorities and hospitals to improve their response to sexual assault victims. Anyone in need of the services outlined above are encouraged to call the following number(s): Crime Victims Assistance Line: 1-800-228-3368 (Voice) 1-877-398-1130 (TTY) Upcoming Events: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which takes place Wednesday, November 15 at 7:00 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Plymouth Place, 315 N. La Grange Road.

Putting an End to Bullying The month of October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, which unites thousands of schools, organizations, and communities across the country to identify ways to address bullying and hopefully stop it before it ever starts. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) defines bullying more technically as "any unwanted aggressive behavior(s) by another youth or group of youths who are not siblings or current dating partners that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be repeated." Bullying puts its victims at increased risk of depression, anxiety, sleep problems, and poor school adjustment. Bullying not only harms its victims, but impacts the perpetrators - who are at increased risk for substance abuse, academic and work problems, and violence later in life. StopBullying.gov offers these warning signs that a child is being bullied. Please note that this list isn't all inclusive and that some children may not show obvious signs of being bullied. • Unexplainable injuries • Lost or destroyed clothing, books, electronics, or jewelry • Frequent headaches or stomach aches, feeling sick or faking illness • Changes in eating habits, like suddenly skipping meals or binge eating. Kids may come home from school hungry because they did not eat lunch. • Difficulty sleeping or frequent nightmares • Declining grades, loss of interest in schoolwork, or not wanting to go to school • Sudden loss of friends or avoidance of social situations • Feelings of helplessness or decreased self esteem • Self-destructive behaviors such as running away from home, harming themselves, or talking about suicide Bullying victims often don't seek help If you were ever bullied or picked on growing up, you know how humiliating it is and the feelings of helplessness that it causes. These feelings can prevent kids from seeking help from adults, including their parents. A child who is bullied and feels helpless may want to reassert their own sense of control by trying to handle the issue on their own. They also may fear that adults will negatively judge them as weak. The low self-worth and sense of isolation that bullying frequently causes can make kids feel that no one cares about or understands their problems. Additionally, a bullied child may fear backlash by his or her attacker/s and peers if he or she seeks adult help. It is therefore on parents / guardians to watch out for the signs of bullying, and to approach their children with the necessary sensitivity to figure out what is going on. Understand that for the child, home is their refuge: don't blame him or her for what is happening to them. You should take steps to nurture your child's self-esteem, like pointing out their positive attributes and talents, and educating them about bullies and bullying to put the problem in perspective. Teach your child not to be afraid to seek out adult help, and that in the end, it takes adult help to stop the bullying. Stop Bullying Right Away! If you or someone you know is being affected by person-to-person or cyber-related bullying, please contact the LaGrange Park Police Department for assistance. UPCOMING EVENTS: Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on Saturday, October 28th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is made possible through assistance provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Coalition for a Drug Free Lyons Township. Wednesday, November 15, 2017 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which takes place Wednesday, November 15 at 7:00 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Plymouth Place, 315 N. La Grange Road. Please remember October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Putting an End to Bullying The month of October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, which unites thousands of schools, organizations, and communities across the country to identify ways to address bullying and hopefully stop it before it ever starts. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) defines bullying more technically as "any unwanted aggressive behavior(s) by another youth or group of youths who are not siblings or current dating partners that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be repeated." Bullying puts its victims at increased risk of depression, anxiety, sleep problems, and poor school adjustment. Bullying not only harms its victims, but impacts the perpetrators - who are at increased risk for substance abuse, academic and work problems, and violence later in life. StopBullying.gov offers these warning signs that a child is being bullied. Please note that this list isn't all inclusive and that some children may not show obvious signs of being bullied. • Unexplainable injuries • Lost or destroyed clothing, books, electronics, or jewelry • Frequent headaches or stomach aches, feeling sick or faking illness • Changes in eating habits, like suddenly skipping meals or binge eating. Kids may come home from school hungry because they did not eat lunch. • Difficulty sleeping or frequent nightmares • Declining grades, loss of interest in schoolwork, or not wanting to go to school • Sudden loss of friends or avoidance of social situations • Feelings of helplessness or decreased self esteem • Self-destructive behaviors such as running away from home, harming themselves, or talking about suicide Bullying victims often don't seek help If you were ever bullied or picked on growing up, you know how humiliating it is and the feelings of helplessness that it causes. These feelings can prevent kids from seeking help from adults, including their parents. A child who is bullied and feels helpless may want to reassert their own sense of control by trying to handle the issue on their own. They also may fear that adults will negatively judge them as weak. The low self-worth and sense of isolation that bullying frequently causes can make kids feel that no one cares about or understands their problems. Additionally, a bullied child may fear backlash by his or her attacker/s and peers if he or she seeks adult help. It is therefore on parents / guardians to watch out for the signs of bullying, and to approach their children with the necessary sensitivity to figure out what is going on. Understand that for the child, home is their refuge: don't blame him or her for what is happening to them. You should take steps to nurture your child's self-esteem, like pointing out their positive attributes and talents, and educating them about bullies and bullying to put the problem in perspective. Teach your child not to be afraid to seek out adult help, and that in the end, it takes adult help to stop the bullying. Stop Bullying Right Away! If you or someone you know is being affected by person-to-person or cyber-related bullying, please contact the LaGrange Park Police Department for assistance.

UPCOMING EVENTS: Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on Saturday, October 28th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is made possible through assistance provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Coalition for a Drug Free Lyons Township. Wednesday, November 15, 2017 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which takes place Wednesday, November 15 at 7:00 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Plymouth Place, 315 N. La Grange Road. Please remember October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Gift Cards: What You Should Know One of the lesser-known roles of the Illinois State Treasurer's Office involves gift cards. Some unused gift cards after a certain period of time are considered unclaimed property. As such, the value of these cards is surrendered to the treasurer's office. There is big money in these cards. Barron's reports that shoppers purchased $130 billion in gift cards in 2015. However, the surrendering of these cards to the treasurer's office means that someone has been deprived of their use. That is why we offer the following advice • Know that the two most common types of cards are retail gift cards and bank gift cards. Retail gift cards only are redeemable at the specific retailer or restaurant that issued the card. Bank gift cards, which carry a payment network such as American Express or Visa, can be used at any location that accepts that specific brand. • Resist the urge to save the card for a rainy day. Doing so may increase the likelihood that some of the card's value will be consumed by fees. Instead, use the card and set aside an equal amount of cash for a rainy day. • For example, consider that while money on a typical gift card cannot expire for at least five years, depending upon the circumstances, inactivity fees can begin in as little as 12 months. Therefore, it is possible that inactivity fees could consume the cash value of a card before the five year window has expired. • When purchasing a gift card, buy from a known and trusted source. Be wary of online auction sites. Read the fine print to determine if there are shipping or handling fees. • Consider the company's location and reputation before purchasing. A retail gift card for someone who does not live near a store's location might not be convenient. Also, a store that files for bankruptcy or goes out-of-business might not accept a gift card. • Treat a gift card like cash. If lost or stolen, report it to law enforcement. Contact the card's issuer to determine if a replacement card is possible and at what cost. Today, the state treasurer's office holds more than $2 billion in unclaimed property. Because our records are updated twice each year, we encourage residents to frequently check our I-Cash database, which can be found at www.illinoistreasurer.gov. Our office never charges a fee to search for, or return, unclaimed property. Sincerely, Michael W. Frerichs Illinois State Treasurer

National Drug Take Back Day - October 28th The La Grange Park Police Department is hosting the National Drug Take Back Day which is taking place on Saturday, October 28th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m, at the Police Department, located at 447 N. Catherine Avenue in La Grange Park. The event is an opportunity for families in the area to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

UPCOMING EVENTS: Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on Saturday, October 28th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is made possible through assistance provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Coalition for a Drug Free Lyons Township. Wednesday, November 15, 2017 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which takes place Wednesday, November 15 at 7:00 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Plymouth Place, 315 N. La Grange Road.

Safety Tips: The data is in. Kids enjoy social media. The studies confirm it. In fact, 89% of teens ages 13 to 17, according to Pew Research, reported using at least one social media site and 71% reported use of more than one site. These numbers are not necessarily alarming. Did you know that just about every social media site allows users to sign up when they reach 13 years of age..... Their friends are on the websites, talking about media they saw on the websites, sharing their experiences and stories on the websites. The "happening" stuff is happening online, and kids want to be a part of the hub. Naturally, especially kids under the age of 13 want to engage in this as well. And they are. A study by knowthenet.org.uk found that about 59% of children have used a social network by the age of 10. Signing up for platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram underage is not difficult. The possibility of their birthdays being faked to inflate ages and companies very rarely monitor this or even do anything about it. Parents may pause at the thought of their younger children using social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, and rightly so. . A child tapping into a network shared by billions of people worldwide and trying to navigate safely is an intimidating thought WHY ARE AGE RESTRICTIONS NEEDED? There is a biological importance to age restrictions. One could raise the question, are we ever developed enough to have our words and actions cemented into a history book accessible to the whole world? I doubt very many people are. But before the age 13, the implications of being exposed to thise massiveness, living history book called the internet are amplified. At around age 12, Biologically, most kids have not developed robust enough cognitive functions for impulse control.ethical thinking. Understanding the effect of a post on social media is beyond the cognitive grasp of a young mind, and any mistake or misjudgment cannot be wiped from the online slate thereby potentially effecting their future. Moreover, if a child is targeted by harassers or predators, their limited ability to handle such a situation at a young age may put them in danger, both mentally and physically. Along with issues with kid's undevelopinged brains and responsibility, there are legal ramifications when kids falsify their age to create a social media account. The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) is designed to protect the personal information of children under 13 online. Companies are required to notify and receive permission from parents to collect personal information from kids. The act also bars companies from collecting images or video that could identify the child. The protections outlined in COPPA are not extended to children under the age of 13 but claiming they are 13 to open an account. When a child signs -up for an account with a falsified birth date, this is outside the reach of protection offered by the act and their personal information is at risk. KEEPING KIDS SAFE Age restrictions on social media platforms are in place to keep kids safe. Unfortunately, violating these restrictions is simple and easy. When young kids falsify their age and use social media, they are often too young to understand the implications of their posts or effectively handle dangerous situations, and cannot be protected by laws directed at the safety of youth online. Luckily, parental control software , like Net Nanny, is a proven method to restricting monitor your children's access to social media until they are responsible and ready. Also, please keep an open line of communication with your child at all times, you can learn a lot by what is going, on by always being a positive part of their lives ! Please note that content similar to that contained in this article is being shared in the La Grange Park Police Department's Adopt-A-Cop Program for students from grades K - 8th. Those with further questions regarding cyber safety planning for their children are encouraged to contact the P.D. directly at (708) 352-7711. As Autumn continues... Motorists are urged to follow these safe driving tips during wildlife mating season: • Be aware of your surroundings and pay attention to deer crossing signs. • Scan the sides of the road for eye shine - the reflection of headlights in the eyes. • Slow down if you see deer. They travel in groups, so more are likely in the area. • Prepare for the unexpected. Deer can stop in the middle of the road or double back. • If a collision is inevitable, try to glance the vehicle off the deer and avoid swerving into opposite lanes of traffic. Please remember October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Safety Tips Pet Found: Phone Scam Overview For many people, pets are like family members and if their pet gets lost it can be heartbreaking for the individual and family. Many people will post flyers with photos of the pet, a phone number for contact, and will offer a reward if found. Phone scammers will use this information paired with the emotional state of the owner of a lost pet in order to steal money from them. The Setup of the Pet Found Phone Scam There are several variations of the pet found phone scam. Pay Reward First Variation In this variation of the scam someone will call and say that they have found your pet. They will usually give a description of the pet that's based off of the pictures that you put on the flyer. They will request that you pay the reward first before they return the pet, they may offer up a number of reasons for why they need you to pay them first. These reasons could range from needing to board the pet while waiting for you to collect it, or they may say that they are in another state and will need the reward money in order to get your pet back to you. In some cases, the scammer will threaten to hurt your pet if they do not receive the reward money when they demand it. This variation will also sometimes work with pairs of scammers, where one will call first and say that they think they've found your pet and ask you for information about it. Then once they have the information they will say that they don't think it is your pet. Later on another scammer working with the first caller will claim that they have your pet and they will provide the information about your pet that you provided to the first caller back to you. In all cases the person will demand that you pay the reward before they return your pet. Pet-Flipping Variation In this variation the scammer has actually stolen your missing pet and will resell it or return it for the reward that's provided. The scammer will call and state that they have found your pet, or they will list it on Craigslist. Selling animals that have been stolen or don't actually exist on Craigslist is a common scam: Spotting and Avoiding This Scam Although, it can be hard to think rationally when a pet is missing it's important not to panic and not to let scammers take advantage of you. Place a minimum amount of information about your pet on the flyers you post. If a caller responds to you and asks for a reward up-front for finding your pet ask them specific questions regarding markings, collar, or tags. Best case scenario is for the caller to send you a picture of your pet in their possession. Never pay a reward by wire-transfer or pre-paid debit card without proof that the caller has your pet. Always ask for the information of the caller, such as full name and a call back number. When getting a new pet look into microchipping it and make sure that you receive the proper paperwork and a bill of sale. Report the Scam If you've experienced phone fraud related to your missing pet contact LaGrange Park Police Department immediately. It's likely that the scammer could be in your area and targeting additional families who have lost pets, or worse they could be stealing pets and reselling them. Please Also Be Aware: New Drug - Parents should know about this drug.This is a new drug known as 'strawberry quick '.There is a type of crystal meth going around that looks like strawberry pop rocks / size of a cough drop(the candy that sizzles and 'pops' in your mouth). It also smells like strawberry and it is being handed out to kids in school yards. They are calling it strawberry meth or strawberry quick.Kids are ingesting this thinking that it is candy and being rushed off to the hospital in dire condition. It also comes in chocolate, peanut butter, cola, cherry, grape and orange.Please instruct your children not to accept candy from strangers and even not to accept candy that looks like this from a friend (who may have been given it and believed it is candy) and to take any that they may have to a proper guardian immediately. Also, please make sure notification is given to your local police department. Please remember that October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

The LaGrange Park Police Department has become aware of a claim recently made on social media regarding an unreported interaction a local resident had with alleged “human traffickers”. We would like to put to rest any concerns or curiosity residents may have with assurances that there is no factual basis regarding the identities or activity of the individuals involved in this contact. Furthermore, follow-up communications with out of state law enforcement officials have disproven claims made in the post in question. We urge residents to dial 9-1-1 to report any suspicious or concerning activity so police department personnel can respond appropriately and immediately.

You are not alone... September is National Suicide Awareness Month. If you are feeling suicidal, help is available. Call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 800/273-TALK, or visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org

WASHINGTON (AP) - Medicare cards are getting a makeover to fight identity theft. No more Social Security numbers plastered on the card. Next April, Medicare will begin mailing every beneficiary a new card with a unique new number to identify them. "Criminals are increasingly targeting people age 65 and older for medical identity theft," Medicare chief Seema Verma told The Associated Press. "We are committed to preventing fraud." Medicare is revealing the cards' new design on Thursday as the government gears up for a massive transition that will involve coordination with 58 million beneficiaries and their family members, plus hospitals, doctors, insurance companies, pharmacies and state governments. While the first mailings of new cards begin next April, Congress has set an April 2019 deadline for all beneficiaries to have received one. One goal is to make sure seniors know what's coming so they're not confused by the change - and in the meantime, are reminded to guard their old cards that, if lost or stolen, can leave them vulnerable to financial and legal consequences. The government recorded 2.6 million cases of identity fraud involving seniors in 2014, up from 2.1 million in 2012. Verma said one woman reported her Medicare card was stolen, got a replacement and thought no more about it until two years later when she learned she might be arrested: The thief had impersonated her to get opioid painkillers. Medicare has set up a website - www.cms.gov/newcard - and is beginning ads to tell beneficiaries what to expect starting next spring. Medicare will automatically mail beneficiaries their new card. They'll be instructed to destroy their old cards after they get a new one. New cards may be used right away. Private insurers already have stopped using Social Security numbers on ID cards. While the Medicare change is crucial for seniors, the transition period also is a time when crooks may pounce, warned AARP's Amy Nofziger, a fraud prevention expert. "If anyone calls you to say you need to pay for your new Medicare card, it is a scam," she said. "If anybody is calling you and asking you to verify your Social Security number in order to issue your new Medicare card, it is a scam."

National Safety Council - Back to School Safety Checklist As children start heading back to school, family life can get pretty hectic. It's important to remember - and share with your children - some key tips that will help keep them safe and healthy throughout the school year. Getting to School Whether children walk, ride their bicycle or take the bus to school, it is vitally important that they - and the motorists around them - take proper safety precautions. Walkers » • Walk on the sidewalk; if there is no sidewalk and you must walk in the street, walk facing traffic . Before crossing the street, stop and look left, right and left again to see if cars are coming • Never dart out in front of a parked car • Parents: Practice walking to school with your child, crossing streets at crosswalks when available • Never walk while texting or talking on the phone • Do not walk while using headphones Bike Riders » • Always wear a helmet that is fitted and secured properly • Children need to know the rules of the road: Ride single file on the right side of the road, come to a complete stop before crossing the street and walk the bike across • Watch for opening car doors and other hazards • Use hand signals when turning • Wear bright-colored clothing Bus Riders » •Teach children the proper way to get on and off the bus •Line up 6 feet away from the curb as the bus approaches •If seat belts are available, buckle up •Wait for the bus to stop completely before standing •Do not cross in front of the bus if possible, or walk at least 10 feet ahead until you can see the other drivers Drivers, Share the Road » •Don't block crosswalks •Yield to pedestrians in crosswalks, and take extra care in school zones •Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians •Never pass a bus loading or unloading children •The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children; stop far enough back to allow them to safely enter and exit the bus Teen Drivers Teens crash most often because they are inexperienced. They struggle judging gaps in traffic, driving the right speed for conditions and turning safely, among other things. As your teen becomes a new driver, learn more about what you can do as a parent to keep them safe. Prevent Injuries at School Following are more discussion topics and resources for parents of school-age children. •Backpack safety •Playground safety •Concussion risk from sports •Head up, phone down

Citizen's Police Academy The second session of the LaGrange Park Citizen's Police Academy will begin on September 14 and run through October 12, 2017. Session II will meet on Thursday evenings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Village Hall Board Room. Please contact Officer Chris Dempsey at 708-352-7711 ext. 270 for more information.

Safety Tips As warmer weather moves into the Midwest, the Forest Preserve District trails will see an increase in use. Bike and pedestrian safety is a two-way street, so we encourage cyclists, pedestrians, and motorists to ride, walk and drive with an understanding-follow the rules of the road and respect each other. The following pictures were taken at the new crossing area at 31st Street just West of Brainard Avenue (Please note this is within Cook County Sheriff's Police Department jurisdiction): The warning signs with lights are designed to alert a driver to conditions ahead that require special attention. The Illinois Vehicle Code requires that a driver of a vehicle shall stop and yield the right-of-way to a pedestrian (or cyclist) crossing the roadway within a crosswalk. A driver is also required to exercise due care to avoid colliding with any pedestrian, or any person operating a bicycle. You can find out more here - Illinois Rules of the Road - https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_a112.pdf Bicycle Rules of the Road - https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_a143.pdf

Citizen's Police Academy The second session of the LaGrange Park Citizen's Police Academy will begin on September 14 and run through October 12, 2017. Session II will meet on Thursday evenings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Village Hall Board Room. Please contact Officer Chris Dempsey at 708-352-7711 ext. 270 for more information.

Safety Tips BACK TO SCHOOL REMINDERS: PLEASE BE AWARE OF YOUR SPEED IN A SCHOOL ZONE (20 MPH), NO CELL PHONE USE & WATCH FOR PEDISTRANS / MORE TRAFFIC FLOW !!!!! Obey Your School Crossing Guards (625 ILCS 5/11-203) A school crossing guard has the same authority as a police officer when directing traffic at their duty assignment. It is against the law to willfully fail or refuse to comply with a lawful order issued by a school crossing guard. http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-203 Also: American Traffic Solutions (ATS) has partnered with the multitalented Mommy blogger, rapper and YouTube sensation Deva Dalporto to release a back-to-school safety parody video titled "Bus, Don't Move," https://youtu.be/9ezxPqoatu4 sang to the tune of Young MC's "Bust A Move." The spoof spotlights the need for parents and drivers to be attentive and careful in school zones and around school buses as students return to school

Citizen's Police Academy The second session of the LaGrange Park Citizen's Police Academy will begin on September 14 and run through October 12, 2017. Session II will meet on Thursday evenings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Village Hall Board Room. Please contact Officer Chris Dempsey at 708-352-7711 ext. 270 for more information.

Safety Tips Please find the attached information from a local police department to assist in parental guidance: One Illinois Sheriff's Office is concerned with parents telling their kids that the police will take them to jail if they misbehave. Every cop has heard it. You are out for lunch or dinner (on break) in uniform and here comes the parent bringing their kid to you that proclaims that you will take them to jail if they misbehave. After a few of these incidents, most cops start intervening by basically telling the child their not being arrested, but always need to respect and listen to their mom and dad. The Kankakee (IL) Sheriff's Office posted a graphic on Facebook that says, "Please stop telling your kids we will take them to jail when they misbehave. We want them to come to us when they are scared...not run away." The agency explained the graphic on Facebook: Our officers see it all the time...a parent and his/her small child walk into a restaurant, or pass an officer on the street, and immediately tell their child, "You better behave or this officer will take you to jail!" While we understand that parents generally make the remark in an effort to make the officer laugh, we want to encourage all parents to teach their children that uniformed police officers are there to help them in times of emergency or when they're lost and/or scared. Please stop threatening your children by telling them that the police will bring them to jail if they misbehave! The next time you pass an officer in public with your child, you can introduce yourself and your child to the officer(s) and explain to your child(ren) that police officers are there to assist if there is ever a need.

Ogden Avenue Road Closure Ogden Avenue between La Grange Road and East Avenue is scheduled to be closed from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on the next three Sundays (8/13, 820, 8/27), so that the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railroad can perform repairs to their bridge. The scope of work includes the replacement of all railroad track, ties, crossing mats and asphalt. Traffic will be detoured to East Avenue, 47th Street, and La Grange Road. Trains passing through the work zone will be sounding their horns to alert the work crews. Additional noise is expected from railroad equipment performing the maintenance work. Questions regarding the project are being fielded by BNSF's Manager of Safety Passenger Operations, Brian Soyk at (630) 692-6297. Road Safe Traffic Systems is also available to answer questions at (316) 778-2112. Safety Tips Teen Driving Key Points for Parents Parents play a huge role in helping their teens gain as much driving experience as possible. Before you begin, ask yourself a few questions. • Can you dedicate several hours a week to practice driving with your teen? AAA recommends your teen complete at least 100 hours of supervised practice driving with a parent before being allowed to drive solo. • Are you committed to coaching in different driving conditions and at different times of the day? It's best to start practice driving in basic low-risk situations and gradually move to more complex situations, such as highways and driving in the rain. • Are you patient enough to provide constructive feedback? There may be times when you want to yell, but remind yourself to remain calm, patient and positive and talk through the driving choices your teen makes. When necessary, agree to take a breather and work it out. • Are you a good role model? Your teen has been watching you drive for years, but you might want to step up your driving game now. Always wear your seat belt, obey traffic laws, never talk or text on the phone while driving, don't speed-the list goes on and on, but remember, lead by example. As the parent, your job is to manage and coach your teen into becoming a safe, experienced driver through practice driving and mentoring. You're in charge and can control how quickly your teen gets to drive under new conditions. Keep in mind, if your teen is breaking family rules or not being a responsible partner in the process, you can delay licensure. If you would like additional information on how to prepare, please click here. Upcoming Events Citizen's Police Academy The second session of the LaGrange Park Citizen's Police Academy will begin on September 14 and run through October 12, 2017. Session II will meet on Thursday evenings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Village Hall Board Room. Please contact Officer Chris Dempsey at 708-352-7711 ext. 270 for more information.

Citizen's Police Academy The second session of the LaGrange Park Citizen's Police Academy will begin on September 14 and run through October 12, 2017. Session II will meet on Thursday evenings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Village Hall Board Room. Please contact Officer Chris Dempsey at 708-352-7711 ext. 270 for more information