La Grange Park Police Department

  • Agency: La Grange Park Police Department
  • Address: 447 N. Catherine, La Grange Park, 60525 IL
  • Chief:

La Grange Park Police Department is located at 447 N. Catherine, La Grange Park, 60525 IL. The La Grange Park Police Department phone number is 708-352-7711.

La Grange Park Police Department News

AVOID FALLING VICTIM TO 'DISTRESSED STRANGER' SCAMS These scams work because the amounts pleaded for are relatively small. While fraud is sorry repayment for a kind heart and generous nature, the only way to entirely safeguard yourself against falling victim to "stranger in distress" scams is to refuse to help strangers who appear to be in dire straits. Such a course of (non)action appeals to some but will be rejected by others who view the occasional $20 lost on a con artist as the cost of maintaining a positive view of their fellow man. Therefore, portions of the following advice will apply to some but not to others: • When strangers seeking your assistance hit you up with sob stories, become comfortable with saying "No, I'm sorry but I just can't do that" and walking away or hanging up. If you cannot bring yourself to say no and instead feel you must make some attempt to aid those who appear to be in need, offer your assistance rather than the cash that has been asked for. Offer to telephone whichever friend or relative the stranded couple believes could come for them, or to ask the police for help in getting the child home. Insist that mugging victims contact the police and indeed place those calls for them. Strictly limit your help to non-monetary forms: making phone calls, brainstorming possible solutions, mucking about under the hood of non-functioning cars, etc. But above all, keep your hand away from your wallet. • Beware the pull on your heartstrings - it's often the purse strings that are actually being reached for. When approached with tales of woe, keep in mind those making the request should have other avenues of relief available to them beyond that of asking random strangers for cash. Is it reasonable to assume they have no family or friends who could come to their assistance, either monetarily or to give them a drive home? Or that they do not have so much as one credit card they could charge a necessity against? Remind yourself that a great many taxis do accept credit cards and so regard with suspicion any well-heeled stranger's claim of needing $20 for cab fare. • Don't ever let strangers into your house to use the phone. Instead, offer to place whatever calls they need made on their behalf. Likewise, those seeking the use of a bathroom should be given directions to the nearest gas station or restaurant. People have been robbed in their homes by those whose "car broke down" or who needed "a glass of water" or "to call a doctor for the baby." Those not assaulted immediately still run the risk of being burgled later by thieves who have inventoried the home's contents and are now familiar with its layout. • Churches in some communities have adopted a policy of refusing to provide cash to those who appeal to them for emergency assistance. Instead, those thrown upon hard times are given whatever other kind of material assistance they have requested (e.g.; tank of gas, place to stay for the night, transportation to another city where a relative is supposedly languishing, something to eat), but are refused money. Anyone coming into contact with persons seeking financial assistance in the ways listed above are encouraged to contact the La Grange Park Police Department via LTACC at (708) 352-2059 so we can thoroughly evaluate what is happening and respond appropriately, from protecting our residents from fraudsters to providing legitimate assistance through our Police Social Worker if circumstances warrant it.

Safety Tips: Sharing the Road with Young Pedestrians According to research conducted by the National Safety Council, most children who lose their lives in bus-related incidents are 4 to 7 years old and they're walking. They are hit by buses or by motorists illegally passing stopped buses. The following precautions can go a long way toward ensuring the safety of children walking in our communities: • Don't block the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or waiting to make a turn, which forces pedestrians to go around you and potentially puts them in the path of moving traffic • Stop and yield to pedestrians passing through crosswalks or intersections, particularly in school zones when flashers are blinking • Always stop for Crossing Guards or other attendants holding stop signs • Take extra care to look for children in school zones, near playgrounds and parks, and in all residential areas • Don't honk your horn or rev your engine to scare pedestrians, even if you have the right of way • Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians • Always use extreme caution to avoid striking pedestrians, wherever they may be and no matter who has the right of way Share the Road: May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month by Stefanie Valentic Summer fun is around the corner and motorcycles already can be seen cruising in your local neighborhoods. May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. Government agencies and safety organizations are reminding both motorists and motorcycle drivers to practice safety while on the road. In 2013, 4,668 motorcycle riders and passengers died in crashes and nonfatal injuries that year totaled 88,000, according to data published by the National Safety Council. The Department of Transportation (PennDOT) reminds operators of motor vehicles that they should watch for motorcycles. Because many two-wheeled vehicles may be difficult to see, drivers should be extra cautious when checking mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes and at intersections. Motorcycles should be respected with the same rights as any vehicle on the roadway. Drivers should leave extra space - at least four seconds when following a motorcycle. In addition, motorcycle drivers need a full lane width to maneuver safety in all types of roads and conditions. Lastly, drivers should always signal their intentions during vehicle operation and never drive impaired. Motorcyclists also have a set of safety measures they should use while driving, including: • Be seen by wearing reflective clothing and put reflective tape on your protective clothing and motorcycle. Also, wear face or eye protection and a DOT-approved helmet • Use common sense by riding sober, obeying all speed limits and allowing enough time to react to potentially dangerous situations • Know your motorcycle and conduct a pre-ride check • Practice safe riding techniques and know how to handle your motorcycle in adverse road and weather conditions Sharing the road safely, staying aware while driving or riding, obeying speed limits and being responsible can help keep motorcycle fatalities and injuries low," according to PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards in a statement. "Taking a training course under the watchful eye of a trained instructor also goes a long way in reducing the likelihood of a crash."

Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on Saturday, April 28th from 10 am - 2 pm. This event is made possible through assistance provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Coalition for a Drug Free Lyons Township.

National Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The La Grange Park Police Department in coordination with the DEA will host a National Drug Take Back Day. This program offers a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of unwanted or expired medications (please note, only drugs in pill form will be accepted - no liquids). Please empty all drugs from their original containers, bottles, or blister packs and place in a sealed baggie for drop off. Can't make it April 28th? A permanent drop box is located in the Village Hall Lobby with drop off access during regular business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

National Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The La Grange Park Police Department in coordination with the DEA will host a National Drug Take Back Day. This program offers a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of unwanted or expired medications (please note, only drugs in pill form will be accepted - no liquids). Please empty all drugs from their original containers, bottles, or blister packs and place in a sealed baggie for drop off. Can't make it April 28th? A permanent drop box is located in the Village Hall Lobby with drop off access during regular business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Safety Tips: PUBLIC UTILITY INFORMATION from the ILLINOIS ATTORNEY GENERAL When it comes to public utilities - your gas, electric, phone, cable and water bills - there's a lot to know, and the information can be confusing. Attorney General Lisa Madigan's Office offers a variety of resources to help you understand your rights and what programs and services are available to you and your family. Having the right information can help you save money and more importantly, avoid being misled. Recent changes to Illinois law allow AT&T to increase the rates for landline telephone service paid by customers enrolled in certain rate packages and permit AT&T to discontinue landline telephone service in particular areas. This FAQ provides information about these changes, which services may be affected, and what consumers can do if they are at risk of losing their landline service. Switching to Digital or Wireless Phone Service: Understanding Your Options Recent Changes to AT&T Landline Service: Increased Prices and Possible Discontinuation of Service The following are resources to help you better understand your rights and the specifics of various public utilities programs: Gas and Electric: Tips for Purchasing Renewable Energy Get Smart About Smart Meters Home Heating Gas and Electric Brochure (en Español) Choosing a Natural Gas or Electricity Supplier Saving Through Net Metering LIHEAP Alert (en Español) Cable and Television: Television Service: Understanding Your Rights Contact Information: For more information or to submit a complaint, contact Attorney General Lisa Madigan's Consumer Fraud Bureau: Chicago 1-800-386-5438 1-800-964-3013 Springfield 1-800-243-0618 1-877-844-5461 Carbondale 1-800-243-0607 1-877-675-9339 Spanish Language Toll-Free Hotline: 1-866-310-8398 You can also submit a complaint online: Consumer Complaint Submission Form If you are considering switching your electricity supplier, visit the Illinois Commerce Commission's website for more information at www.icc.illinois.gov

National Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The La Grange Park Police Department in coordination with the DEA will host a National Drug Take Back Day. This program offers a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of unwanted or expired medications (please note, only drugs in pill form will be accepted - no liquids). Please empty all drugs from their original containers, bottles, or blister packs and place in a sealed baggie for drop off. Can't make it April 28th? A permanent drop box is located in the Village Hall Lobby with drop off access during regular business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Citizens Police Academy The La Grange Park Citizens Police Academy is a FREE 5 week program designed to provide participants with a working knowledge of the La Grange Park Police Department and the services we provide. The goal of this program is to ensure a safer community by utilizing education to enhance understanding, increase positive communication, and foster partnerships between citizens and the Police Department. The Academy provides attendees with an overview of the divisions of the La Grange Park Police Department, demonstrations of different operational functions, and discussions regarding different services we provide. Participants must be at least 18 years of age, pass a criminal background check, and sign a waiver and hold harmless agreement. Enrollment is open to all, with priority given to La Grange Park residents and those who work in the Village. Class size is limited. Classes are scheduled for April 12th, 19th, 26th and May 3rd and 10th from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Questions should be directed to Officer Chris Dempsey at cdempsey@lagrangepark.org or call (708) 352-7711 ext. 275.

TIPS: April marks Distracted Driver Awareness Month ARLINGTON, VA - American Trucking Associations is calling attention to Distracted Driving Awareness Month in April by offering advice and insight from the elite professional truck drivers who make up ATA's Share the Road highway safety program. "The highway is my workplace and I know we all want to be safe while on the roads, but by far the biggest issue jeopardizing our safety is distracted driving," professional truck driver Eric Flick of FedEx Freight told the ATA. "The good news is, correcting distracted driving is easy, you just have to put the phone down and focus on the task at hand." Distracted Driving Awareness Month began in 2014 when the U.S. Department of Transportation noticed an uptick in distracted driving and sought to bring awareness to the issue. TIPS TO STAY SAFE: Out of sight, out of mind. Putting your phone on silent and storing it somewhere that is not visible, but easily accessible, is the best way to avoid temptation. Everyone knows the feeling of seeing a notification and wanting to immediately respond because we all live busy lives, but in order to stay safe and keep other motorists safe, it's best to keep your phone out of sight. Never text and drive. There's very few driving habits that are worse than texting and driving. Taking your eyes off the road to send a one-word text takes at least 5 seconds. If you're going 60 mph on the highway, your vehicle travels more than the length of a football field in 5 seconds! Do not take those 5 seconds for granted because a lot can happen in that short amount of time - debris can fly into your lane, an animal can run in front of your car, or another driver might change lanes and hit the brakes. Be prepared to drive before getting behind the wheel. Eat your granola bar at home. Save the newspaper for when you get to work. Make sure you're fully awake by getting the proper amount of sleep the night before. There are many ways in which we can get sidetracked throughout the day and there are certainly times when we have to multitask. Driving is not one of those times. Properly secure every item in your vehicle. You don't want something to fall to the floor and spill while you're traveling at 60 miles per hour down the highway. Try to suitably secure all items and definitely do not place anything on your lap or near the driver's side floor. Items can slide under your brake pedal and prevent you from stopping if incorrectly secured. Set a good example for young drivers and speak up when uncomfortable. Young drivers who have grown up in the age of tremendous technological advancement may not know the risks involved in distracted driving. Talk to them about why it's important to focus and why sharing the road with other drivers is a big responsibility. Also, if you're a passenger in a vehicle and the driver is distracted by an electronic device, say something or offer to type the text and send it yourself. Safety is much more important than avoiding a few minutes of awkward conversation.

Safety Tips: The Better Business Bureau Warns About Cell Phone Porting Scams By Sean Rose Did you know that with a few easy steps someone could steal your phone number and phone service? A new type of scam has been happening across the country and is a new way for scammers to steal your hard earned money, and even your identity. The scariest part is that this type of scam, called porting or port-out scamming, is that it can help scammers get past added security measures on personal and financial accounts and logins. To put it another way, think of how many times you have set up an email address, social networking, or logged onto your bank account online or had to change your password. How many times did you have to verify your identity by being sent a code via text message? Now what if you weren't the only one who was reading that message? This new type of scam absolutely could bypass that layer of security and has a huge potential for your identity to be stolen faster than you think. Luckily you can protect yourself and your Better Business Bureau® is here to help you identify and protect yourself. What is a cell phone porting or port-out scam? A scammer finds out your name and phone number and then attempts to gather as much personal identifiable information (PII) as possible about you. PII includes name, address, Social Security number (Social Insurance number in Canada), date of birth, and other information that can be used for identity theft. They then will contact your mobile provider, impersonating you, and inform them that your phone was stolen and request the number be "ported" with another provider and device. In some cases, if they were really brave and in a retail location and/or online, they might even try to buy a new phone which could make a sales representative incentivized to quickly fulfill their request and forgo some formal verification procedures. The scariest part? Once they have your number ported to a new device they can then start accessing and gaining entry to accounts that require additional authorization in terms of a code texted directly to your phone for security verification. Those added security measures are usually in place on accounts provided by email providers, social networks, tax preparation software, and even financial institutions BBB offers these tips to help protect yourself from this specific type of scam: • Inquire with your wireless provider about port-out authorization. Every major wireless has some sort of additional security for accounts or for port-out authorization that customers can set up, like a unique pin, or add verification question, which will make it more difficult for someone to port-out your phone. Contact your mobile provider and speak to them specifically about porting and/or port out security on your account. • Watch out for unexpected "Emergency Calls Only" status. Call your mobile phone company if your phone suddenly switches to "emergency call service only" or something similar. That's what happens when your phone number has been transferred to another phone. • Be vigilant in about communications you receive. Watch out for phishing attempts, alert messages from financial institutions, texts in response to two-factor authorization requests. If you've fallen victim to this type of scam, alert your mobile provider, financial institutions and take the standard steps to combat identity theft. Also, BBB encourages you to file a report on BBB ScamTracker and be a hero to your community by warning others.

Adopt-A-Cop Ice Skating Party Please join us for this fun FREE event! Saturday, March 24, 2018 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Darien Sportsplex Ice Arena 451 Plainfield Road Darien, Illinois (630) 786-666 Questions? Please contact Sergeant Felix Hernandez at (708) 352-7711 _____________________________________________________________________

Citizens Police Academy The La Grange Park Citizens Police Academy is a FREE 5 week program designed to provide participants with a working knowledge of the La Grange Park Police Department and the services we provide. The goal of this program is to ensure a safer community by utilizing education to enhance understanding, increase positive communication, and foster partnerships between citizens and the Police Department. The Academy provides attendees with an overview of the divisions of the La Grange Park Police Department, demonstrations of different operational functions, and discussions regarding different services we provide. Participants must be at least 18 years of age, pass a criminal background check, and sign a waiver and hold harmless agreement. Enrollment is open to all, with priority given to La Grange Park residents and those who work in the Village. Class size is limited. Classes are scheduled for April 12th, 19th, 26th and May 3rd and 10th from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Questions should be directed to Officer Chris Dempsey at cdempsey@lagrangepark.org or call (708) 352-7711 ext. 275.

Hope & Healing: How Teachers can Help Teens Deal with Suicide Grief Terri Erbacher, PhD The teen years are already tumultuous, and the bereaved teen needs special attention. Under ordinary circumstances, teenagers go through many changes in their body image, behavior, attachments and feelings. While people of all ages struggle with loss, teenagers face particularly painful adjustments following the death of a peer, friend, or loved one. Do teens grieve like adults? Teens grieve deeply but often work very hard to hide their feelings. Fearing the vulnerability that comes with expression, they look for distractions rather than stay with the grief process long enough to find real relief. Feelings can be turned off quickly, much like flipping a light switch. Teens can act as if nothing has happened while they are breaking up inside. You may observe teens who take on the role of caregiver to family members or friends, in effect denying their own grief. Gender makes no distinctions when it comes to experiencing grief, but the outward signs may be different. Young men of this age may have a particularly hard time when they have been taught that showing emotion is something that girls do - but macho guys don't. Do grief support groups work? Yes, by sharing feelings with one another, teens find out they are not alone and that others are also struggling to rebuild shattered lives. Grief groups help teens feel understood, accepted and supported. Common Grief Symptoms/Behaviors a teen may experience: Emotional Effects Shock & Disbelief Anger & Irritability Depression/Sadness Despair or Helplessness Terror/Fear Guilt or Self-Blame Anxiousness or Worry Loss of pleasure in activities Confusion Physical Effects Fatigue Insomnia or Disturbed Sleep Stomach/Headaches Decreased Appetite Hyperarousal or Easily Startled Cognitive Effects Difficulty Concentrating Trouble Making Decisions Trouble Remembering Impaired Self-Esteem Intrusive Thoughts or Memories Nightmares Social/Behavioral Effects Social Withdrawal or Isolation Increased Relationship Conflict Refusal to go to School or Activities Crying Easily Change in Daily Patterns Regression in Behavior Risk Taking Behaviors (substance use) Aggression or Oppositional Behaviors If adults are open, honest and loving, experiencing the loss of someone loved can be a chance for young people to learn about both the joy and pain that comes from caring deeply. How adults respond when someone loved dies has a major effect on the way teens react. Adults can: • Be available if a teen approaches you to talk, but realize many teens may not come to you • Teens often need caring adults to confirm that it is okay to be sad • Remind teens that there is no "right" way to grieve and they may feel varied emotions • Listen without judgment and share your own feelings and concerns honestly • It is okay to tell a teen that you don't know answers to some difficult questions • Try to re-establish a routine, with appropriate expectations, as soon as possible • Try not to take anger or irritability personally as it may be directed toward adults • Remember that telling teens to "be strong" discourages them from sharing feelings • Help teens understand that the hurt they feel now won't last forever • Help teens realize that ignoring their own grief may make them feel more alone and sad • Emphasize the importance of them seeking help when needed • Help teens realize the importance of looking out for each other • Help the child find a grief group if they are interested as to not help them feel so alone • Be gentle and compassionate in all of your helping efforts When should a referral to professionals be made? It can be difficult to separate normal teen behavior from that of a grieving teen in trouble. Some of the indicators that let you know when a teen needs more support are: * Dramatic behavior changes at home, school or socially * Feeling extraordinary pressure, overwhelmed, or burdensome * Teen is beginning to isolate themselves from peers and school * Depression that lasts more than 2 weeks after the death of a loved one * Talk about dying or wishing they were dead * Extreme anger that causes problems at home, school or with friendships * Feelings of guilt that leave the teen feeling isolated and alone * Substance abuse - teens sometimes turn to drugs or alcohol to rid pain * Acting out or risk taking behaviors (acting out sexually, driving fast) * Skipping school or dropping grades If a child mentions suicide, do take it seriously. If it is not an emergency, but you are concerned about your child, you may decide to contact your school's guidance office, your medical doctor, or a private therapist or psychiatrist. If there seems to be a suicidal emergency, DO NOT LEAVE YOUR CHILD ALONE. GET HELP IMMEDIATELY! ***Remember that the NUMBER ONE protective factor in the life of a child is a caring adult who listens to a child without judgment. This is often a teacher!*** Source: Erbacher, T.A. (2013). Lending a Helping Hand: Suicide in Schools: Empowering School Districts. Booklet published by the Delaware County Intermediate Unit, Morton, PA.

Adopt-A-Cop Ice Skating Party Please join us for this fun FREE event! Saturday, March 24, 2018 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Darien Sportsplex Ice Arena 451 Plainfield Road Darien, Illinois (630) 786-666 Questions? Please contact Sergeant Felix Hernandez at (708) 352-7711 _____________________________________________________________________ The La Grange Park Citizens Police Academy is a FREE 5 week program designed to provide participants with a working knowledge of the La Grange Park Police Department and the services we provide. The goal of this program is to ensure a safer community by utilizing education to enhance understanding, increase positive communication, and foster partnerships between citizens and the Police Department. The Academy provides attendees with an overview of the divisions of the La Grange Park Police Department, demonstrations of different operational functions, and discussions regarding different services we provide. Participants must be at least 18 years of age, pass a criminal background check, and sign a waiver and hold harmless agreement. Enrollment is open to all, with priority given to La Grange Park residents and those who work in the Village. Class size is limited. Classes are scheduled for April 12th, 19th, 26th and May 3rd and 10th from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Questions should be directed to Officer Chris Dempsey at cdempsey@lagrangepark.org or call (708) 352-7711 ext. 275.

Report fraud or financial exploitation 1-800-222-4444, option 2 AARP Foundation ElderWatch engages hundreds of volunteers each year to help older consumers recognize, refuse and report fraud and scams. This website provides additional information and tools to help protect consumers against financial exploitation: https://www.aarp.org/aarp-foundation/our-work/income/elderwatch/report-fraud/ __________________________________________________________________________________ Scam Alert: IRS Urges Taxpayers to Watch Out for Erroneous Refunds Beware of Fake Calls to Return Money to a Collection Agency The Internal Revenue Service today warned taxpayers of a quickly growing scam involving erroneous tax refunds being deposited into their bank accounts. The IRS also offered a step-by-step explanation for how to return the funds and avoid being scammed. Following up on a Security Summit alert issued Feb. 2, the IRS issued this additional warning about the new scheme after discovering more tax practitioners' computer files have been breached. In addition, the number of potential taxpayer victims jumped from a few hundred to several thousand in just days. The IRS Criminal Investigation division continues its investigation into the scope and breadth of this scheme. These criminals have a new twist on an old scam. After stealing client data from tax professionals and filing fraudulent tax returns, these criminals use the taxpayers' real bank accounts for the deposit. Thieves are then using various tactics to reclaim the refund from the taxpayers, and their versions of the scam may continue to evolve. Thousands of people have lost millions of dollars and their personal information to tax scams. Scammers use the regular mail, telephone, or email to set up individuals, businesses, payroll and tax professionals. PLEASE NOTE: The IRS DOES NOT initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information. Recognize the telltale signs of a scam.

Upcoming Events: Wednesday, March 14th 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Please don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which will next take place on Wednesday, March 14th at 7 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Mattones, 9 E 31st Street in La Grange Park. Stay connected to the Police Department by signing up for Safety Briefs. Please e-mail Chief Rompa's Secretary, Shelley Johnson at sjohnson@lagrangepark.org to be added to the list. _________________________________________________________________________________ Adopt-A-Cop Ice Skating Party Please join us for this fun FREE event! Saturday, March 24, 2018 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Darien Sportsplex Ice Arena 451 Plainfield Road Darien, Illinois (630) 786-666 Questions? Please contact Sergeant Felix Hernandez at (708) 352-7711 _____________________________________________________________________ The La Grange Park Citizens Police Academy is a FREE 5 week program designed to provide participants with a working knowledge of the La Grange Park Police Department and the services we provide. The goal of this program is to ensure a safer community by utilizing education to enhance understanding, increase positive communication, and foster partnerships between citizens and the Police Department. The Academy provides attendees with an overview of the divisions of the La Grange Park Police Department, demonstrations of different operational functions, and discussions regarding different services we provide. Participants must be at least 18 years of age, pass a criminal background check, and sign a waiver and hold harmless agreement. Enrollment is open to all, with priority given to La Grange Park residents and those who work in the Village. Class size is limited. Classes are scheduled for April 12th, 19th, 26th and May 3rd and 10th from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Questions should be directed to Officer Chris Dempsey at cdempsey@lagrangepark.org or call (708) 352-7711 ext. 275.

Severe Weather Preparedness Week March 4-10, 2018 Don't wait until severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, and flooding are occurring to think about what you should do to stay safe! For information regarding severe weather preparedness, please visit the following webpage: https://www.weather.gov/ilx/severe-prep _____________________________________

Upcoming Events: Wednesday, March 14th 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Please don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which will next take place on Wednesday, March 14th at 7 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Mattones, 9 E 31st Street in La Grange Park.

Safety Tips: Cook County Sheriff Thomas J. Dart is warning of a sophisticated phone scam targeting Cook County residents. In this scam, an automated voice claims there is a warrant out for the arrest of the receiver of the call and that they must call a phone number with a Chicago area code to resolve it. Upon calling the number, a person claiming to be an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) agent states that the caller must make payment or the warrant will be passed on to law enforcement authorities. The fake agent may give a bogus badge number and be able to recite the last four digits of the caller's social security number. This is a known scam that becomes particularly pervasive around tax time. The IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers without sending prior notification via mail. Additionally, the IRS does not work with local law enforcement authorities in this manner. The Sheriff's Office is investigating the origin of the calls. Sheriff Dart offers the following tips to avoid becoming a phone scam victim: • If you believe the call is suspicious, hang up • Never give personal information, such as social security or bank account numbers, over the phone • Legitimate IRS agents and law enforcement agencies do not ask that payments be made via pre-paid debit cards • In some cases, the phone numbers may appear to be from legitimate agencies due to phone number spoofing applications. If this is the case, call that agency to determine if there is a legitimate reason to contact you. Do not use the phone number the caller gives you More tips for preventing fraud at your home: Top 10 Red Flags for Home Repair Scams Have you made your first spring trip to your local hardware store yet? With the arrival of spring, many consumers are already busy with projects around the house. Unfortunately, warm weather ushers in both blooming flowers and scammers offering all manner of shoddy home repair "services" and outright scams. This spring, don't be a victim of home repair scams. Arm yourself by being aware of the following red flags of potential home repair scams: 1. Contractors who appear uninvited at your doorstep or who call or email you out of the blue 2. The contractor says they are doing work in your neighborhood and claims they have "extra material" left over 3. You feel pressured to make a decision and sign a contract for the work immediately 4. The contractor offers a "special deal" available "today only" 5. The contractor points out a "problem" with your home that you never noticed yourself before. Some unscrupulous scam artists have been known to offer "free" inspections and then break something on purpose so they can be paid to "fix" the problem 6. The contractor demands full payment up front, particularly if payment is demanded in cash 7. The contractor lacks identification, such as a permit from the city or locality 8. Offers to give you a discount so that your home can be used as a "model" or if you find additional customers for him/her 9. The contractor offers to help finance the project, either from his own funds or the funds of an associate, especially if your home equity or home deed is involved 10. The contractor insists you come and examine "damage" with him (while an associate steals valuables from your home) Some of the more common types of home repair scams involve duct cleaning, driveway sealant, leaky foundations, landscaping, furnace and roofing repair. This is by no means an exhaustive list, however. Consumers can take precautions to avoid home repair scams, including: • Get multiple estimates on any home repair job before signing a contract • Check out the contractor's references and visit the site to check out the quality of the work itself, if possible • Check for complaints with the Better Business Bureau and make sure the contractor is registered with your state board of contractors and your local building inspection office • Never pay in full up front, especially if cash is the only payment accepted • Make sure the contractor is insured and bonded • Document in writing the scope of the work to be done and the complete cost and time necessary to complete the job and how payment will be handled.

Upcoming Events: Wednesday, March 14th 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Please don't miss our popular Coffee with the Police series, which will next take place on Wednesday, March 14th at 7 p.m. Chief Rompa and staff will share information on current police efforts and take questions and concerns from residents in attendance. This event will be held at Mattones, 9 E 31st Street in La Grange Park. Stay connected to the Police Department by signing up for Safety Briefs. Please e-mail Chief Rompa's Secretary, Shelley Johnson at sjohnson@lagrangepark.org to be added to the list.