Hawaii Department of Public Safety

  • Agency: Hawaii Department of Public Safety
  • Address: 919 Ala Moana Blvd # 110, Honolulu, 96814 HI
  • Chief:
Phone: 808-587-1288
Fax: (808) 587-1282

Hawaii Department of Public Safety is located at 919 Ala Moana Blvd # 110, Honolulu, 96814 HI. The Hawaii Department of Public Safety phone number is 808-587-1288.

Hawaii Department of Public Safety News

On Sunday, October 21, 2018, more than one hundred forty (140) inmates wearing the official 2018 Race for the Cure Hawaii t-shirts, plus civilian staff and volunteers joined together to walk the Women’s Community Correctional Center (WCCC) recreation field to show their support of breast cancer awareness and the Susan G. Komen Hawaii Breast Cancer Foundation. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The women, staff and volunteers walked 20 times around the recreation field (2 miles) to promote breast cancer awareness and raise funds to benefit the organization. “When we were approached by someone on our staff with this idea, I thought it was a wonderful way to support a worthy cause,” said WCCC Warden Eric Tanaka. “We are always looking for ways the women can promote a healthy lifestyle while also giving back to the community, and the women were eager to do it. We plan to continue this partnership with the Susan G. Komen Hawaii Breast Cancer Foundation for years to come.” Quote from Amanda Stevens, Susan G. Komen Hawaii Breast Cancer Foundation: "From the opening oli and pule by Hyacinth, a survivor and inmate, to the commaraderie of the women coming together for this cause, to speaking with Warden Tanaka about how this disease has impacted his family, it was an incredibly moving day and we look forward to partnering with WCCC every year to Walk for the Cure." About Susan G. Komen and Komen Hawaii Susan G. Komen is the world’s largest breast cancer organization, funding more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit while providing real-time help to those facing the disease. Komen has set a Bold Goal to reduce the current number of breast cancer deaths by 50 percent in the U.S. by 2026. Komen was founded in 1982 by Nancy G. Brinker, who promised her sister, Susan G. Komen, that she would end the disease that claimed Suzy’s life. Komen Hawaii is working to better the lives of those facing breast cancers in the local community. Through events like the Komen Hawaii Race for the Cure®, Komen Hawaii has invested $4,237,487.00 in community breast health programs Hawaii and has helped contribute to the more than $920 million invested globally in research.

On Sunday, October 21, 2018, more than one hundred forty (140) inmates wearing the official 2018 Race for the Cure Hawaii t-shirts, plus civilian staff and volunteers joined together to walk the Women’s Community Correctional Center (WCCC) recreation field to show their support of breast cancer awareness and the Susan G. Komen Hawaii Breast Cancer Foundation. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The women, staff and volunteers walked 20 times around the recreation field (2 miles) to promote breast cancer awareness and raise funds to benefit the organization. “When we were approached by someone on our staff with this idea, I thought it was a wonderful way to support a worthy cause,” said WCCC Warden Eric Tanaka. “We are always looking for ways the women can promote a healthy lifestyle while also giving back to the community, and the women were eager to do it. We plan to continue this partnership with the Susan G. Komen Hawaii Breast Cancer Foundation for years to come.” Quote from Amanda Stevens, Susan G. Komen Hawaii Breast Cancer Foundation: "From the opening oli and pule by Hyacinth, a survivor and inmate, to the commaraderie of the women coming together for this cause, to speaking with Warden Tanaka about how this disease has impacted his family, it was an incredibly moving day and we look forward to partnering with WCCC every year to Walk for the Cure." About Susan G. Komen and Komen Hawaii Susan G. Komen is the world’s largest breast cancer organization, funding more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit while providing real-time help to those facing the disease. Komen has set a Bold Goal to reduce the current number of breast cancer deaths by 50 percent in the U.S. by 2026. Komen was founded in 1982 by Nancy G. Brinker, who promised her sister, Susan G. Komen, that she would end the disease that claimed Suzy’s life. Komen Hawaii is working to better the lives of those facing breast cancers in the local community. Through events like the Komen Hawaii Race for the Cure®, Komen Hawaii has invested $4,237,487.00 in community breast health programs Hawaii and has helped contribute to the more than $920 million invested globally in research.

Check out the story. The women at WCCC decided to walk 2 miles around their rec field for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. One of the women is a breast cancer survivor and talks about what this event meant to her.

Deputies Reid Ogata, John Mallari and Luke Kim represented the Sheriffs Division at the Kawananakoa Middle School Career Day on October 19. Some other attendees were Hawaiian Airlines, Nurses, Hawaii News Now/Billy V, National Guard, Electricians, Marketing Directors, Pearl Harbor Shipyard, Queen’s Hospital K9, Bankers, National Guard and the Honolulu Fire Department. Sheriffs presented an introduction to the Sheriffs Division to six classes. Numerous questions were asked about what they like about their job, the training needed, what are the chances for advancement, where they work, behaviors they must follow, and consequences for not meeting behavioral expectation. Of course the kids also asked about the items on their duty belt and what was the scariest thing they ever saw. After the presentation and question and answer session, the Sheriffs called the kids up to the front where they could look at items like handcuffs, shields, body armor and metal detectors. Check out the photos!

WOMEN’S COMMUNITY CORRECTIONAL CENTER FURLOUGH INMATE ASHLEY AKANA FAILED TO RETURN Work furlough inmate Ashley Akana failed to return to WCCC furlough housing unit tonight. She was supposed to return by 9:30 pm. Sheriffs and HPD were notified. Akana is 34 years old, 5'4" tall, and 210 lbs. She has brown hair and brown eyes. Akana is serving time for Burglary 1st, Theft, Forgery of Credit Cards, Promoting Dangerous Drugs 3rd. Her minimum sentence will expire on 11/2/2019. She now faces an additional escape charge when found. She is a community custody inmate in the furlough program with pass privileges. Community custody is the lowest classification status. If seen, please call 911 or Sheriffs at 586-1352.

UPDATE: Missing furlough inmate Paul Ah Sing returned to OCCC Module 20 at 11:50 PM (10/20/18), when he was supposed to return by 8:00 pm. He now faces an additional escape charge and other administrative action. _____________ Posted 10/20/18: Work furlough inmate Paul Ah Sing failed to return to OCCC Module 20 work furlough housing unit tonight. He left for work in the morning and was supposed to return by 8:00 pm. Sheriffs and HPD were notified. Ah Sing is 55 years old, 5'7" tall, and 175 lbs. He has brown hair and brown eyes. Ah Sing is serving time for Murder 2nd degree. He now faces an additional escape charge when found. He is a community custody inmate in the work furlough program with pass privileges. Community custody is the lowest classification status. If seen, please call 911 or Sheriffs at 586-1352.

The Sheriffs Division participated in today's college/career day at the Waikele Elementary School. It was a fun day for all. The children enjoyed looking at our assortment of handcuffs, and equipment and of course touring our Patrol SUV. Check out the photos!

The Sheriff Division along with some of their K9s and the Narcotics Enforcement Division participated in the Celebrate Safe Communities event held on Saturday at the Pearlridge Center. Law Enforcement and first responders from all across Oahu participated in this event which lets kids and families get an up-close and personal look at what these agencies do. There was a Keiki ID booth, entertainment and demonstrations. Kids had a great time with our Sheriff K9s and got to learn a lot about the Division. The Narcotics Enforcement Division also held the Hawaii Medication Take Back Program. People could bring their unused or expired mediation for safe disposal. Pictured: The Sheriff Division personnel who participated include Deputies from Capitol Patrol, Kapolei Section, and the Airport Section along with some of their K9 deputies.

Here's the video from yesterday's Basic Corrections Recruit Class 18-02 Graduation. The Department of Public Safety (PSD) welcomed a new class of adult correctional officers at a graduation ceremony held at the Neal Blaisdell Center in Honolulu on Wednesday, September 26. Fifteen (15) recruits graduated from Basic Corrections Recruit Class (BCRC) 18-02 training and will begin their careers as correctional officers in facilities across the state. BCRC is a 9-week training that includes 360 hours of classroom time and physical training. Recruits learn standard of conduct, professionalism and ethics, report writing, interpersonal communications, maintaining security, crisis intervention, security threat groups (gangs), mental health, first aid, firearms, and self-defense tactics. All incoming classes receive Recruit Field Training along with Basic Corrections Training. That means, during the final weeks of training, they go into the facility and begin their job with the guidance of their training sergeants. The fifteen (15) have been assigned to the following jail and prison facilities: Halawa Correctional Facility 6 Hawaii Community Correctional Center 2 Oahu Community Correctional Center 2 Maui Community Correctional Center 2 Kauai Community Correctional Center 2 Waiawa Correctional Facility 1

The Department of Public Safety (PSD) today welcomed a new class of adult correctional officers at a graduation ceremony held at the Neal Blaisdell Center in Honolulu. Fifteen (15) recruits graduated from Basic Corrections Recruit Class (BCRC) 18-02 training and will begin their careers as correctional officers in facilities across the state. BCRC is a 9-week training that includes 360 hours of classroom time and physical training. Recruits learn standard of conduct, professionalism and ethics, report writing, interpersonal communications, maintaining security, crisis intervention, security threat groups (gangs), mental health, first aid, firearms, and self-defense tactics. All incoming classes receive Recruit Field Training along with Basic Corrections Training. That means, during the final weeks of training, they go into the facility and begin their job with the guidance of their training sergeants. The fifteen (15) have been assigned to the following jail and prison facilities: Halawa Correctional Facility 6 Hawaii Community Correctional Center 2 Oahu Community Correctional Center 2 Maui Community Correctional Center 2 Kauai Community Correctional Center 2 Waiawa Correctional Facility 1

Video is of today's news conference where the Governor stated that he is approving the relocation of the O‘ahu Community Correctional Center to the Animal Quarantine Site. (Acceptance of final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). Governor's full news release is below: Gov. Ige selects animal quarantine station as site of new Oʻahu Community Correctional Center FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE August 28, 2018 The State of Hawaiʻi has completed its review of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the relocation of the O‘ahu Community Correctional Center (OCCC). The Department of Accounting and General Services (DAGS) and the Department of Public Safety (PSD) submitted the EIS to the state on July 8, 2018. Gov. David Ige and the Office of Environmental Quality Control (OEQC) accepted the EIS on Aug. 23, 2018, as satisfactory fulfillment of the requirements of Chapter 343, Hawai‘i Revised Statutes. Today, Gov. David Ige confirmed that the Animal Quarantine Station site will be the home of the new OCCC facility. “The existing jail at Dillingham and Puʻuhale is severely overcrowded and in disrepair. Building a new correctional facility is one of my top priorities. Moving OCCC to Halawa is also a tremendous opportunity to reposition Kalihi for the future, when the land along the rail route will be used for new economic development, affordable housing, and open spaces as envisioned by the community,” said Gov. David Ige. “Replacing OCCC with a modern facility has been a goal of the department for over a decade,” said PSD Director Nolan P. Espinda, “and we have never been closer to achieving that goal than we are today. OCCC is severely outdated and overcrowded and because of this, the possibility of federal oversight is always looming over us. A new OCCC would help us house the current population while providing the critical program space and resources necessary to help inmates successfully return to their communities.” “DAGS appreciates all the hard work that has gone into this process over the past several years,” added DAGS Comptroller Roderick Becker. “Based on the many technical studies, and with the involvement of elected officials, stakeholders and the public, PSD and DAGS are confident that the Animal Quarantine Station site is the best choice for the future home of OCCC.” Gov. Ige looks forward to working with the Hawaiʻi State Legislature to identify the funding and project delivery strategies necessary to continue advancing this essential project. Once funding is appropriated, the design and construction process for the new OCCC facility will begin in full. The state will also continue to: • Seek approvals for regulatory permits • Assist with planning for the Department of Agriculture’s new, relocated Animal Quarantine Station • Assist with the design and construction of expanded Women’s Community Correctional Center housing in Kailua -- to prepare the facility for receiving women who will be relocated from OCCC. To view the Acceptance of the Final EIS for OCCC go to the OEQC’s Environmental Notice publication: http://oeqc2.doh.hawaii.gov/The_Environmental_Notice/2018-08-23-TEN.pdf Additional information concerning the OCCC project is available at: http://dps.hawaii.gov/occc-future-plans.

A volunteer appreciation dinner and award ceremony was held on Oahu and Kauai to honor all of the people who donate their time teaching inmates important skills. Many of our volunteers, (unpaid staff), have been giving of their time, talent and energy to help inmates with their re-integration back into the community and reunite with their family. Many have been in service as long as 5 years to 50 years. They come from all walks of life, background and careers. They represent organizations such as Toastmasters, 12 Step programs e.g. Narcotics/Alcoholics Anonymous, teachers and educators from various colleges, social services e.g. Waikiki Health. Majority of our volunteers are made up of religious volunteers representing the diverse denominations throughout the state e.g. Catholic churches, Jehovah Witnesses, Calvary Chapels, Unity Church, Vipassana of Hawaii, Latter Day Saints, various Baptist churches are represented, Seventh Day Adventist, Ohana Family of the Living God, Prayer Center of the Pacific. First Assembly of God, City of Refuge, New Hope Oahu and New Hope Windward. The event focuses on the volunteers and acknowledge their tireless work and dedication to their unique calling. . Also, it is a time to acknowledge the Chaplains and Chaplain Assistants for their hard work and faithfulness in running the programs at their respective facilities. The volunteers are the core and strength of the program and we are so grateful for them. A big thank you goes out to Waiawa Correctional Facility and Kauai Community Correctional Center for hosting. The Waiawa Correctional Facility Band and Choir performed for everyone. The inmates also helped prepare the meal as a way of saying thank you for all that the volunteers do. The KCCC Lifetime Stand inmates helped to prepare the meal and also provided the music/band entertainment at KCCC. The LTS female inmates also contributed to making the table centerpieces, which took many hours to create, as well as all the leis that were presented to each volunteer. Several of the inmates also gave personal testimony on how the volunteers have impacted them during their incarceration.

**Updated with pictures from the pinning ceremony on Maui and Hawaii Island** Four (4) Deputy Sheriffs were promoted to Sergeant today at an official promotion and pinning ceremony at the Public Safety Director’s office in Honolulu. Two of the new sergeants will be on Oahu, one on Maui and one on Hawaii Island in Hilo. The two Oahu deputies were officially presented with their new badges and a certificate of promotion by Director Nolan Espinda, Deputy Director for Law Enforcement Renee Sonobe Hong and Sheriff Al Cummings. Family members and colleagues then came up to pin their new Sergeant badges. The Public Safety Director, Deputy Director for Law Enforcement and Sheriff all acknowledged their well-deserved promotions and emphasized the importance of their new role as managers and leaders for all of the Deputies who will serve under their command. “We would to extend a heartfelt congratulations to our new Oahu sergeants Ralph Fukumoto and Keola Kekaulike, Maui sergeant Geoffrey Hicks and Hilo sergeant Norman Brown for this accomplishment,” said Sheriff Al Cummings. “We look forward to watching them grow in their new leadership role.” Note: The new sergeants from Maui and Hilo were not able to be at today’s ceremony on Oahu. Sergeant Hicks’ official pinning ceremony will be held on Monday on Maui and Sergeant Brown’s pinning ceremony will be held on Wednesday in Hilo.

**Updated with pictures from the pinning ceremony on Maui and Hawaii Island** Four (4) Deputy Sheriffs were promoted to Sergeant today at an official promotion and pinning ceremony at the Public Safety Director’s office in Honolulu. Two of the new sergeants will be on Oahu, one on Maui and one on Hawaii Island in Hilo. The two Oahu deputies were officially presented with their new badges and a certificate of promotion by Director Nolan Espinda, Deputy Director for Law Enforcement Renee Sonobe Hong and Sheriff Al Cummings. Family members and colleagues then came up to pin their new Sergeant badges. The Public Safety Director, Deputy Director for Law Enforcement and Sheriff all acknowledged their well-deserved promotions and emphasized the importance of their new role as managers and leaders for all of the Deputies who will serve under their command. “We would to extend a heartfelt congratulations to our new Oahu sergeants Ralph Fukumoto and Keola Kekaulike, Maui sergeant Geoffrey Hicks and Hilo sergeant Norman Brown for this accomplishment,” said Sheriff Al Cummings. “We look forward to watching them grow in their new leadership role.” Note: The new sergeants from Maui and Hilo were not able to be at today’s ceremony on Oahu. Sergeant Hicks’ official pinning ceremony will be held on Monday on Maui and Sergeant Brown’s pinning ceremony will be held on Wednesday in Hilo.

Department of Public Safety Director Nolan Espinda giving an update on the Brian Smith situation.