La Grange Park Police Department

  • Agency: La Grange Park Police Department
  • Address: 447 N. Catherine, La Grange Park, 60525 IL
  • Chief:

La Grange Park Police Department is located at 447 N. Catherine, La Grange Park, 60525 IL. The La Grange Park Police Department phone number is 708-352-7711.

La Grange Park Police Department News

Cold Weather Safety Tips from the American Red Cross As the weatherman is predicting more snow and single digit temperatures, we want to remind residents to take proper safety precautions for themselves and to check on elderly neighbors, friends, and relatives to be sure they are doing ok as well. Safety at Home If the power goes out, use flashlights to provide light. Do not use candles for lighting. Don't forget your pets - bring them indoors. If that's not possible, provide adequate shelter to keep them warm and make sure they can get to unfrozen water. Other tips include: • Prevent frozen pipes - when the weather is very cold outside, open cabinet doors to let warm air circulate around water pipes. Let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing. • Keep the thermostat set to a consistent temperature. • Never use a stove or oven to heat your home. Keep a glass or metal fire screen around the fireplace and never leave a fireplace fire unattended. If using a space heater, follow the manufacturer's instructions on how to safely use the heater. Place it on a level, hard, nonflammable surface. Turn the space heater off when you leave the room or go to sleep. Keep children and pets away from your space heater and do not use it to dry wet clothing. • Use a sturdy fire screen around fireplaces when in use. Burn only wood - never burn paper or pine boughs. • Use generators correctly - never operate a generator inside your home, including the basement or garage. Do not hook up a portable generator directly to your home's wiring. The safest thing to do is to connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. • Check smoke alarms once a week by pressing the test button and replacing batteries as necessary. • Don't overload your electrical outlets. If You Venture Outside Wear layered lightweight clothing to keep warm. This works better than a single heavy coat. Gloves (or mittens) and a hat will prevent loss of body heat. Cover your mouth to protect your lungs. Wear waterproof, insulated boots to keep your feet warm and dry and to maintain your footing in ice and snow. You should also: • Walk carefully on snowy, icy sidewalks. • Be extremely careful when shoveling snow. Take frequent breaks and stay hydrated. Avoid overexertion. • Understand the hazards of wind chill, which combines the cooling effect of wind and cold temperatures on exposed skin. • Seek medical attention immediately if you have symptoms of hypothermia including confusion, dizziness, exhaustion, and severe shivering. • Also seek immediate medical attention if you have symptoms of frostbite including numbness, flushed gray, white, blue, or yellow skin discoloration, numbness, or waxy feeling skin. If You Do Get Stuck in the Snow • Stay with your car. Do not try to walk to safety. • Tie a brightly colored cloth (preferably red) to the antenna for rescuers to see. • Start the car and use the heater for about 10 minutes every hour. Keep the exhaust pipe clear so fumes won't back up in the car. • Leave the overhead light on when the engine is running to help rescuers see the vehicle. • Keep one window away from the blowing wind slightly open to let in air.

Suicide Awareness and Prevention Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States among all people over 10 years old, and rates are on the rise. Approximately 40,000 people in the US commit suicide every year, which is 24% higher than in 1999 and about 9,000 more than those killed in car accidents. Understanding the warning signs and risk factors can help prevent suicides. What are the Warning Signs? These are the warning signs, according to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255): • Sleeping too much or too little • Acting anxious or upset • Showing rage • Withdrawing or isolating • Extreme mood swings • Behaving recklessly • Increasing use of drugs and/or alcohol • Talking about seeking revenge • Talking about feeling hopeless, trapped, or a burden to others • Looking for a way to kill themselves (for example, buying a gun) • Talking about suicide or wanting to die If you notice any of these signs in a loved one, you should seek help. What Makes It More Likely that a Person Will Commit Suicide? According to the World Health Organization (WHO), many personal traits and experiences make it more likely that an individual will try to commit suicide. They include: • Severe depression • Other mood disorders (such as bipolar disorder, also called manic depression) • Anxiety disorders • Impulsivity • Sense of hopelessness • Family history of suicide • Knowing people who committed suicide or hearing about suicides • Serious medical illness • Personal loss • Conflicts with other people • Broken relationships • Legal or work-related problems • History of physical or sexual abuse • Sexual orientation • Schizophrenia For example, when teenagers and young adults know someone who recently committed suicide, they are more likely to commit suicide. News coverage of suicides can also increase the number of other suicides, especially among adolescents. How to Get Help There are many ways to get help for you or for a loved one. For immediate help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) or text the Crisis Text Line at 741741 to connect with a trained crisis counselor. For long-term help (not for a crisis), psychotherapy, or "talk therapy," can make a big difference. It is best if the therapist is licensed in your state and specially trained to work with individuals struggling with depression. Therapy can help prevent people who are struggling with suicidal thoughts from hurting themselves. It can also help support individuals who have a friend or family member who has committed suicide. Therapy can help people increase hope and learn new, helpful strategies to deal with scary feelings in more healthy ways. If therapy doesn't work well enough, some people may try medication. Medicines can help reduce feelings of depression, anxiety, and other unhealthy thoughts, but unfortunately these medications can also increase thoughts of suicide. In fact, there is a warning on all antidepressants that mention that risk. Antidepressants are especially likely to increase thoughts of suicide in adolescents and young adults, but people of any age can also become more suicidal when taking antidepressant medications. Children taking antidepressants should be very closely monitored for suicidal thoughts, worsening depression, or changes in attitude. Prevention The National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH) recommends the following steps to help a loved one dealing with emotional pain and suicidal thoughts or intentions (which are more serious than thoughts): • Ask: Confront your loved one in a caring and nonjudgmental way by saying: "I care about you, and I am worried. Are you thinking about hurting or killing yourself?" Research shows questioning does not increase suicides or the thought of suicide. As this can be a difficult thing to do, you might seek support from someone else who cares about the person. • Keep them safe: Ask the person if they have any weapons or other lethal items that are easily accessible. If they do, help this person figure out a plan for removing the weapons so that they cannot be accessed. • Be there: Be open to listening and learning what the person is experiencing, thinking, and feeling. Simply being with the person and listening is a great way to show that you care, and it might help your loved one open up to you. • Help them connect: Help your loved one find a mental health professional. Provide resources such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255), where trained crisis workers are available to talk 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can even help put the number in this person's phone or call with them so that they have extra support. To help them find a therapist, use SAMHSA's (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator, or call SAMHSA's National Helpline (1-800-622-4357). Remember: If the situation is potentially life-threatening, call 911 or go to a hospital emergency room immediately. • Stay connected: Keep in touch with the person after they are connected with a mental health professional. Following up with people who are thinking about suicide decreases their risk of committing suicide.

We're Hiring! The La Grange Park Police Department will be accepting completed employment applications for the position of Police Officer from September 17, 2018, through November 16, 2018. There is no cost to apply for this position. Hiring requirements include the following: • United States citizenship • A high school diploma or equivalent • A minimum of 60 hours of course credit from an accredited college or university • A valid driver's license • At least 21 years of age by the application closing date and under 35 years of age as of the posting of the initial eligibility list unless otherwise provided by 65 ILCS 5/10-2.1-6 • No felony conviction(s) per preliminary Criminal History Check • Binocular vision correctable to 20/20 Application packets may be picked up in person at the La Grange Park Police Department front desk at 447 N. Catherine Avenue, La Grange Park, Illinois, 60526, weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Completed packets must include the following items: • A completed Application for Employment form • A signed Authorization to Release Information and Waiver form • Transcript(s) documenting required college/university course work (copies are acceptable) PLEASE NOTE: Packets must be returned by 4:00 p.m. on November 16, 2018, to be considered. Applicants must also complete preliminary testing for Municipal Registry Certification prior to submitting their completed application packets by the November 16th deadline. The Registry will confirm applicant certification with the La Grange Park Police Department. To scheduling testing, applicants should contact: Municipal Police and Fire Registry Conrad and Associates 930 York Road, Suite 18 Hinsdale, Illinois 60521 (630) 920-0571 Those who meet employment criteria will continue in this process with an orientation and written test to be administered on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, at 6p.m. in the lower level of the La Grange Park Village Hall, 447 N. Catherine Avenue. A photo I.D. will be required to check in prior to testing, which should take approximately 2 hours to complete. Once written exams are completed, candidates with the highest scores on the eligibility list will be scheduled for oral interviews with our three-member Board of Police Commissioners. Oral interviews will consist of a series of scenario-based questions. Upon completion of oral interviews, a final eligibility list will be established and retained for two years. Recruit Officers will be selected from this list and are subject to polygraph, psychological, and medical exams (including vision testing, spinal examination, and drug screening) prior to enrollment in Police Academy Training. Questions or requests for additional information should be directed to Shelley Johnson, Secretary to the Chief of Police, at (708) 352-7711, ext. 203.

Protect Your Paycheck from New Phishing Scam Little Red Riding Hood and her nemesis, the wolf, can still teach us an unexpected lesson today about identity thieves and a new threat targeting payroll information Remember the childhood story about Little Red Riding Hood? The villain, a.k.a. the wolf, locked grandma in the closet, put on granny's nightie and night cap, and pretended to be grandma tucked into bed when Red showed up. But Red was not fooled by the wolf. Times have changed. The villains today are identity thieves. Like the wolf, who was simply looking for a tasty but ill-gotten meal, identity thieves have a single goal to steal your money. And like the wolf, identity thieves masquerade as people you trust in order to do you harm, delivering malicious links or attachments via email and text messages. Known as phishing, these scams rely on your inability to spot the sender as a fraudster to trick you into handing over what they treasure most -- your personally identifiable information. One of the latest phishing scams targets the valuable PII associated with your paycheck. You can be like Little Red Riding Hood by outsmarting your villain - challenge any request for personally identifiable information, even if it looks like the request comes from someone you trust. The Payroll Angle The personally identifiable information associated with your paycheck includes Social Security numbers, addresses, birthdates and, most importantly, bank account numbers used for direct deposit of your check. The fraudster masquerades as your employer's Human Resources (HR) or payroll department and contacts you and other employees directly via email. As part of the scam, you will be asked to enter, update or confirm your personally identifiable information, either by clicking a link to a dummy website or by responding to the phishing email directly. The scammer's goal is to obtain your direct deposit bank account information. They then use that information to redirect your pay into a different bank account that they can access. Employers may first become aware of this scam when employees start complaining that their pay is missing, at which time the money is already gone. Variations of Payroll Phishing Scam A payroll or direct deposit phishing attempt is a type of Business Email Compromise (BEC), or a hoax in which the attacker gains access to a corporate email account and assumes the owner's identity to defraud the company or its employees, customers or partners of money. Creative criminals have multiple variations of defrauding folks with a payroll or direct deposit-related scam. For companies that use a third-party payroll vendor, an employee can be lured to a spoofed website (a fake site designed to resemble the actual third-party's site), where they are asked to provide login credentials, which the scammer collects for their own use. In another variation, the fraudster gains control of or spoofs an employee's email account, then contacts the payroll vendor to request a password change for an online payroll portal. Because this particular scam involves payroll, employees are more likely to respond in an effort to avoid having their regular pay interrupted. "Stealing paychecks hits people where it hurts," said Trevor Buxton, Fraud Communications Manager and Certified Fraud Examiner with PNC Security. "Having awareness of this particular scam, and knowing how to spot it, is the best way to ensure the villains don't get paid for your hard work." Don't Take the Bait As with all phishing campaigns, the email or text message involved often share certain tell-tale features hinting that they are fake: • Misspellings • Grammatical errors • Offers of fantastic prizes • A sense of urgency • Request for personally identifiable information (PII) • Request for User IDs and Passwords • Threats with consequences • Specific demands Fortunately, there are things that can help individuals and small businesses detect and avoid a phish: • Hover the cursor over the sender's email address, which should bring up a "mouseover" box containing the sender's actual email address. Inspect it for irregularities that could signal signs of spoofing. • Use email's "forward" feature rather than "reply." "Forward" forces the user to type in a known and trusted email address, whereas "reply" will respond directly to the phisher. • Do not open attachments in a suspected phish. • Do not call phone numbers contained in a suspected phish. Go to a known source of information for contact information, such as your company's HR or payroll departments, using a phone number or email address that you would typically use. If they are not aware of the request, you should follow your company's process for reporting suspicious email. If your company does not have a formal process, file a complaint with the Federal Bureau of Investigation Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) at www.ic3.gov.

October is National Bullying Prevention Month Kindness is one of the most significant contributors to positive school, workplace, and community climates and is an antidote to bullying. 5 Simple Ways To Show Kindness by Christine Carter Kindness seems to be a lost art these days. It's a rare gem, hidden among the pushers of haste and the irritable impatient and often distracted people we pass in our lives. I often search for evidence of Kindness, as I'm going and doing out in the world, and what I often see is a lot of people that want nothing more than to stay to themselves. I get that. I really do. I've been one of them many times. But it still makes me sad to think the majority of people out there going and doing are so consumed by their own hassles; they really don't think to look any further. I try to work on this from my end of the world. I often feel compelled to engage with other people. I try to be intentionally kind when chatting with the cashier or passing by someone who appears to need a little lift. Oftentimes, it lights us both up with a new air of goodness. Sometimes, my words and smiles fall on empty ground - no new buds are gonna grow there. But I still keep trying. Most of the time, it's worth it. I'd like to think there are at least five simple ways to be kind. These efforts of kindness are truly doable for us all. Here's what I find most inspiring: When we are kind, we have more energy and feel better about ourselves and the world we live in. So here goes... 1. Smile. Seriously, just smile would you? When the cashier asks for your I.D: Smile. When the crosswalk guard waves to you: Smile. When you're at your kid's sporting event: Smile. When you're walking through the grocery store: Smile. When you are in the break room at work: Smile. When you are out in this world, doing what you do: Smile. You know how it feels when someone smiles at you, right? Just think how many people you can show kindness to with simply curving up your lips and showing your teeth. It's infectious, and in this simple act itself - you are lighting up the world because what often happens when you smile? Others smile too. 2. Give Eye Contact. This one is just really interesting to me, because I rarely see eyes anymore. I'm out and about and NO ONE LOOKS AT EACH OTHER. We are all drifters in our own little worlds, head into our phones or our own business - not interested in what wonders are around us. What really fascinates me, are the conversations I can have with people without them looking at me at ALL. I'm always looking around me and spotting people here and there, going about their business without so much as a glance toward other human beings in their path. Have you ever noticed when you DO make eye contact with someone else? Connection happens. We need more connection. 3. Say "Thank You." What happened to manners? I know many of you have them, and use them, but there are some really rude people out there. A simple thank you can have an enormous impact on a person, don't you think? I might as well add "Please" to this task too. Any time you have a chance, say these words and mean them. Appreciation goes a long way in this world. We need more of it. I think there are many people who do their jobs or live in their roles without the gratitude they deserve. I've witnessed people walking away from others with no mention of a thank you, and I've also seen many request or demand things with no "please". Why are we so intolerable these days? These words translate into respect. We all deserve that, yes? Two words, they make a difference. Let's all use them more. 4. Acknowledge other people's presence. As you fly by those people in your life that you may pass over and over again, it's a really kind thing to acknowledge their presence. I wave at the poor janitor who got dealt the hand of standing out in the cold morning air to monitor school drop offs. I may be tired and wanting to drive out of there fast, but waving and smiling and looking at him as I go is a simple gesture I can safely say he appreciates. He smiles and waves back every time. I've been known to do this at both schools, and I'm surprised to have teachers thank me for my morning waves and smiles. It takes little effort, and yet it goes a long way to acknowledge those people you pass on a regular basis. They are out there in your community, doing their job as best they can. Wave, nod, smile, say please and thank them, would you? 5. Compliment someone. This one's my favorite thing to do, but it takes just a little itty bit more effort on your part, but I promise the effort is worth it. When we are in public, there are so many people we see and often we think to ourselves how cute they look in those boots, or how great their hair looks, or how adorable their kid is - why don't we just SAY IT to them? I seem to be one that has no problem doing that. I just love seeing people's faces light up after I deliver an impulsive compliment to someone I meet or pass by when I'm out in the world. It *sometimes* throws the person off kilter, but more often it surprises them with delight. If we have nice thoughts about people, why not tell them? It doesn't take much time at all, and I promise it's worth those few seconds of discomfort when approaching someone with kind words. I wish more people did this. If you are naturally shy, I understand your hesitancy. But may I challenge you to step out of that safe place and go for it? It won't be as painful as you anticipate it to be. I promise. And the payoff is totally worth it. We all live in a world where kindness is so desperately needed. I'm still working on all of these ways to be kind, especially on those bad days. You know the ones, right? I think those are the days I need to invest more kindness into the world, because it ultimately makes me FEEL more kind- and that's always a win in my book. As if this isn't enough to motivate us toward being kind, think about your kids if you have them. My kids are often with me as they observe these things and consequently pick up many kind habits themselves. I LOVE seeing kindness in both my kids - the eye contact, the smiling, the waving and hearing them say "please" and "thank you" or compliment another person. On the flip side, I've also heard them scream at drivers from the back seat. Ahem. I'm still working on car kindness. *Cough cough*. The bottom line is this: Our kids will COPY US. If we model for our children these simple acts of kindness, just think how the next generation can fill our lives, our stores, our schools, our work places - our world with more of what is truly lacking and sorely needed. It doesn't take much, just more intention and awareness. We all need to have more of both.

Saturday, October 27, 2018 is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on from 10 am - 2 pm. This event is made possible through assistance provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Coalition for a Drug Free Lyons Township.

FRAUD ALERT! HHS OIG Hotline Telephone Number Used in Scam The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) recently confirmed that the HHS OIG Hotline telephone number is being used as part of a telephone spoofing scam targeting individuals throughout the country. These scammers represent themselves as HHS OIG Hotline employees and can alter the appearance of the caller ID to make it seem as if the call is coming from the HHS OIG Hotline number of 1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477). The perpetrator may use various tactics to obtain or verify the victim's personal information, which can then be used to steal money from an individual's bank account or for other fraudulent activity. HHS OIG takes this matter seriously. We are actively investigating this matter and intend to have the perpetrators prosecuted. It is important to know that HHS OIG will NOT use the HHS OIG Hotline telephone number to make outgoing calls and individuals should not answer calls from 1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477). We encourage the public to remain vigilant, protect their personal information, and guard against providing personal information during calls that purport to be from the HHS OIG Hotline telephone number. We also remind the public that it is still safe to call into the HHS OIG Hotline to report fraud. We particularly encourage those who believe they may have been a victim of the telephone spoofing scam to report that information to us through the HHS OIG Hotline 1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477) or spoof@oig.hhs.gov. Individuals may also file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) Protect Yourself! Do not provide any personal information to unknown individuals, including any of the following information: • a social security number • date of birth • credit card information • driver's license number • bank account information • mother's maiden name Do not verify your name or any other personal information. Be extremely cautious. Report the Scam If you are a victim of the telephone spoofing scam, contact the HHS OIG Hotline or file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. Be sure to include: date and time you received scam the call any other details from the scam call

Saturday, October 27, 2018 is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on from 10 am - 2 pm.

We're Hiring! The La Grange Park Police Department will be accepting completed employment applications for the position of Police Officer from September 17, 2018, through November 16, 2018. There is no cost to apply for this position. Hiring requirements include the following: • United States citizenship • A high school diploma or equivalent • A minimum of 60 hours of course credit from an accredited college or university • A valid driver's license • At least 21 years of age by the application closing date and under 35 years of age as of the posting of the initial eligibility list unless otherwise provided by 65 ILCS 5/10-2.1-6 • No felony conviction(s) per preliminary Criminal History Check • Binocular vision correctable to 20/20 Application packets may be picked up in person at the La Grange Park Police Department front desk at 447 N. Catherine Avenue, La Grange Park, Illinois, 60526, weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Completed packets must include the following items: • A completed Application for Employment form • A signed Authorization to Release Information and Waiver form • Transcript(s) documenting required college/university course work (copies are acceptable) PLEASE NOTE: Packets must be returned by 4:00 p.m. on November 16, 2018, to be considered. Applicants must also complete preliminary testing for Municipal Registry Certification prior to submitting their completed application packets by the November 16th deadline. The Registry will confirm applicant certification with the La Grange Park Police Department. To scheduling testing, applicants should contact: Municipal Police and Fire Registry Conrad and Associates 930 York Road, Suite 18 Hinsdale, Illinois 60521 (630) 920-0571 Those who meet employment criteria will continue in this process with an orientation and written test to be administered on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, at 6p.m. in the lower level of the La Grange Park Village Hall, 447 N. Catherine Avenue. A photo I.D. will be required to check in prior to testing, which should take approximately 2 hours to complete. Once written exams are completed, candidates with the highest scores on the eligibility list will be scheduled for oral interviews with our three-member Board of Police Commissioners. Oral interviews will consist of a series of scenario-based questions. Upon completion of oral interviews, a final eligibility list will be established and retained for two years. Recruit Officers will be selected from this list and are subject to polygraph, psychological, and medical exams (including vision testing, spinal examination, and drug screening) prior to enrollment in Police Academy Training. Questions or requests for additional information should be directed to Shelley Johnson, Secretary to the Chief of Police, at (708) 352-7711, ext. 203.

Enhanced Village Vehicle Sticker Enforcement Coming: All residents who own a motor vehicle or any person having control or use of a motor vehicle owned by a resident of the village are required to annually obtain a village vehicle license for each motor vehicle used on any public street. A motor vehicle is any vehicle subject to the registration requirements of the Illinois Secretary of State. During the month of October, police department personnel will be conducting enhanced enforcement to ensure residents have purchased and properly displayed their village stickers on vehicles parked in town. Stickers now cost $62.50. Senior citizens may purchase one reduced price sticker per household for $32.50*. * Please note that senior rate stickers may not be purchased online. Vehicle license stickers may be purchased online at www.lagrangepark.org or in person at the Village Hall Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Let Amazon in your house? Get mail at your desk? Here's how to beat 'porch pirates' BY ALLISON KITE akite@kcstar.com You did your research, shopped around and finally found what you wanted online. In a few days, it'll be yours. The tracking website says it's been delivered. But it's not there. Maybe it's been stolen. It's easy for so-called "porch pirates" to snatch packages from your front door or apartment building stoop, and amid the rise of online retail giants, like Amazon, package theft is in the spotlight. Federal postal officials don't release reports on how many packages are stolen every year, but according to Shorr Packaging Corp., 30 percent of those surveyed in 2017 had had a package stolen. Packages were stolen from about 11 million homeowners last year, according to Package Guard. But just as online shopping brought porch pirates to the forefront, tech companies and shippers have been coming up with solutions to combat it. Some would use tech to fight the very issue that tech aggravates. Other solutions are simpler. The key is to avoid leaving packages on the porch unattended. Kevin LaBranche said he lives in a downtown loft building in Kansas City and luckily was home when his new iPhone arrived and he got a notification from Amazon. If he hadn't been home, "an $800 phone would have sat down at the front door for several hours," LaBranche said. Here are a few tips from tech companies and shippers to avoid having your cargo stolen: Be there when your package arrives UPS recommends customers have packages "sent to where they are - not where they are not." "In other words, if they are at work during the day, they can have packages delivered to where they work," Kim Krebs, a media relations manager for UPS, said in an email. "They can also choose to have things sent to a relative or neighbor who is home during the day." Package Guard says 74 percent of packages are swiped during the day while homeowners are at work. Having a package sent to the office may not be an option for everybody. LaBranche said some employers won't allow employees to receive personal mail at the office. Paul Shade, an inspector with the U.S. Postal Service, said letting a neighbor know you're expecting a package is ideal. "That's always a safer bet so that it's not sitting on the porch for a lengthy period of time," Shade said. Shade also recommended making sure your package requires a signature so the shipper won't leave it on your porch unless someone signs for it. He said that's the "best way to ensure that it is delivered to a person and not left on the porch." Invest in tech If you're ready to let Amazon in your house, Amazon Key allows delivery inside your front door for free. The Amazon Key kit starts around $210 for a keypad entry, camera and streaming capabilities, but after that, Prime members get the in-home delivery service for free. The tech giant does the same for your car. Download the Amazon Key App, synchronize to your car service account and park within two blocks of your delivery address. The driver will unlock the car using the app, put the package inside and lock the car again. Amazon will send a final notification confirming your delivery is complete . For now, the service works only if you have a Volvo with a Volvo On Call account or a Chevrolet, Buick, GMC or Cadillac with an OnStar account - all from 2015 or newer. For online shoppers who don't want the delivery driver in their home or their car, companies like Ring and Google-owned Nest provide mounted outdoor cameras that could deter would-be thieves. Nest's camera can alert homeowners when somebody's on the porch. "If a package thief approaches, you'll get an alert on your phone, so you can scare the scoundrel away by sounding a warning through the camera's built-in microphone," the company says. With another Nest service, you could create a video clip of the porch pirate stealing your long-awaited package and share it with police. Both companies also sell video doorbells. Be specific with the shipper That big hedge in front of your house may come in handy here, or that side wall you put the trash cans behind. Some shippers, like UPS, will let you give specific instructions on where to drop your package. "UPS drivers can enter that information into their hand-held computers for future deliveries," Krebs said. At LaBranche's apartment, packages are sometimes left on the downtown sidewalk rather than delivered to the office, which is open only from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. "A lot of times, I've come into the apartment building and I've seen boxes lying there, and I've taken them inside," LaBranche said. Pick up your packages Another option would be avoiding home delivery altogether. Amazon has lockers where customers can have their packages delivered and pick them up at their convenience. Customers using UPS can get notifications that their package is on the way and redirect it to a UPS "access point." Krebs said UPS has nearly 9,000 access points in delis, grocery stores, dry cleaners, florists and UPS store locations nationwide. The company also provides mailbox services at the UPS store. LaBranche said that for some, scheduling deliveries like an appointment with a cable company might work. Shippers would give customers a four-hour window to expect delivery. If your package is stolen ... If the porch pirates manage to snatch your new purchase, be sure to notify police. Shade also encouraged people to contact the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the law enforcement arm of the postal service. He said he didn't think people were aware of the office. "Certainly if more people report it, it gives us more data to be able to pursue the cases," Shade said.

Saturday, October 27, 2018 is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on from 10 am - 2 pm. This event is made possible through assistance provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Coalition for a Drug Free Lyons Township.

We're Hiring! The La Grange Park Police Department will be accepting completed employment applications for the position of Police Officer from September 17, 2018, through November 16, 2018. There is no cost to apply for this position. Hiring requirements include the following: • United States citizenship • A high school diploma or equivalent • A minimum of 60 hours of course credit from an accredited college or university • A valid driver's license • At least 21 years of age by the application closing date and under 35 years of age as of the posting of the initial eligibility list unless otherwise provided by 65 ILCS 5/10-2.1-6 • No felony conviction(s) per preliminary Criminal History Check • Binocular vision correctable to 20/20 Application packets may be picked up in person at the La Grange Park Police Department front desk at 447 N. Catherine Avenue, La Grange Park, Illinois, 60526, weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Completed packets must include the following items: • A completed Application for Employment form • A signed Authorization to Release Information and Waiver form • Transcript(s) documenting required college/university course work (copies are acceptable) PLEASE NOTE: Packets must be returned by 4:00 p.m. on November 16, 2018, to be considered. Applicants must also complete preliminary testing for Municipal Registry Certification prior to submitting their completed application packets by the November 16th deadline. The Registry will confirm applicant certification with the La Grange Park Police Department. To scheduling testing, applicants should contact: Municipal Police and Fire Registry Conrad and Associates 930 York Road, Suite 18 Hinsdale, Illinois 60521 (630) 920-0571 Those who meet employment criteria will continue in this process with an orientation and written test to be administered on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, at 6p.m. in the lower level of the La Grange Park Village Hall, 447 N. Catherine Avenue. A photo I.D. will be required to check in prior to testing, which should take approximately 2 hours to complete. Once written exams are completed, candidates with the highest scores on the eligibility list will be scheduled for oral interviews with our three-member Board of Police Commissioners. Oral interviews will consist of a series of scenario-based questions. Upon completion of oral interviews, a final eligibility list will be established and retained for two years. Recruit Officers will be selected from this list and are subject to polygraph, psychological, and medical exams (including vision testing, spinal examination, and drug screening) prior to enrollment in Police Academy Training. Questions or requests for additional information should be directed to Shelley Johnson, Secretary to the Chief of Police, at (708) 352-7711, ext. 203.

Safety Tips: How to Talk With Teenagers About Vaping By Lisa Damour E-cigarettes are only the latest entrant into the longstanding category of perils we might wish for our teenagers to avoid. Vaping - using an electronic cigarette to inhale vapor infused with flavor, nicotine, both or neither - holds promise as a path away from the harms of conventional cigarettes. But a report released last month by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine found evidence that vaping might prompt teenagers or young adults to try cigarettes, making it a route toward smoking for a generation of teenagers whose cigarette use is at a 40-year low. Even when vaping doesn't lead to smoking, parents have reason to be concerned about the impact of nicotine on the developing brain and the potential health risks associated with inhaling aerosolized flavoring chemicals. Vaping is generally understood to be less risky than smoking. But not vaping is healthier than vaping. So how do we have successful conversations with teenagers about the hazards of e-cigarettes? Here's a guide to how you might address vaping - or almost any other form of risky business - with the teenagers in your life. Accept That Facts Don't Go Far Research consistently finds that having good information doesn't necessarily lead to making smart choices. Adolescents (and adults) routinely do things they know to be unhealthy, such as speeding, skipping sunscreen and eating fast food. We should ensure that our teenagers are working with the facts about the potential dangers of vaping, having unprotected sex, using drugs and so on. But we should not assume that simply dropping knowledge on a teenager, especially as a way to get a conversation rolling, will get the job done. Get Their Perspective Instead of leading with facts, consider starting with genuine curiosity. Setting judgment to the side, ask, "What's your take on e-cigarettes?" or "Do you know kids who are vaping?" or something along those lines. Finding out what adolescents already know and think about vaping, or any other hazardous behavior, does two things at once. First, it shapes how the rest of the exchange might go. If your teenager wrinkles her nose and says, "I tried it and thought it was weird," you're having one conversation; if she responds slyly, "Lots of kids are doing it - I don't see why it's a big deal," you're having another. Second, asking teenagers what they know about any topic increases the odds that they'll want to hear what we know about that topic, too. To get our teenagers to take our concerns about vaping - or anything else - seriously, we should start by recognizing that they may have already drawn upon firsthand observation or personal experience to arrive at their own conclusions. Ask Why Before Suggesting Why Not Adolescents have their reasons for vaping. Some do it for the thrill of defying authority, often in view of their peers. Compact vaporizers like Juuls, which look like flash drives, allow teenagers to easily conceal their e-cigarettes and take quick, discreet hits at home, in school hallways and even in class. And some teenagers may enjoy the stimulant quality of nicotine while trusting that they are swimming in the risk-taking shallows by forgoing harder drugs. Adolescents, by their nature, often seek ways to push the limits set by adults; vaping happens to offer a convenient vehicle for doing so. Other teenagers may simply find themselves wanting to sample flavors with names like "German Chocolate Beefcake" or be drawn to e-cigarettes by mesmerizing videos of tricks done with the exhaled vapor. If adults address only the downsides of risky temptations it's easy for adolescents to dismiss us as killjoys who just don't get it. Appreciating the allure of vaping and the other chancy things teenagers sometimes do can make it easier for adults to say their piece. In the end, we want our teenagers to weigh their options and be self-protective. We can model this approach by saying, "Look, it's not that I hate fun. It's that I love you." Share Your Concerns Teenagers can be quick to tune out adults when we treat all hazards as equal. To this end, we should allow that experimenting with conventional e-cigarettes is almost certainly less harmful than experimenting with illegal drugs, while also helping teenagers understand that using e-cigarettes is not without risks. Of course, vaping is also replacing the traditional ways of smoking marijuana - what may seem like a strawberry-kiwi flavored vape could contain cannabis-infused oil. "We are still learning new things about vaping, none of which are reassuring," says Dr. Skyler Kalady, assistant professor of pediatrics and medical director of complex care at the Cleveland Clinic. "The developing brain is a lot more susceptible to addiction," she notes, "and nicotine is highly addictive." Even vaping solutions without nicotine sometimes contain compounds that may become toxic or even carcinogenic when vaporized. In addition, metal microparticles that are released by the e-cigarette's heating coils can, according to Dr. Kalady, "put kids at risk for reactive airway disease, asthma and even emphysema." We keep our teenagers' trust when we are forthright about what we know and what remains unclear. "Nicotine is highly addictive," we might say, "and even if you don't get hooked, it can affect the way your brain is developing. As for the long-term impact of inhaling chemicals and metal particles, there's still a lot we don't know. But why risk it?" Concede the Limits of Your Power Parenting teenagers would be a lot less stressful if we could lay down the law and leave it at that. But adopting a thou-shalt-not stance overestimates the adult's control and underestimates the teenager's autonomy. It can also inspire teenagers to abuse their independence to make a point. To stay out of a fruitless (if not counterproductive) cat-and-mouse game, it's often useful for parents to take a two-pronged approach, articulating high expectations in one breath and acknowledging the limits of their power in the next. "Vaping isn't harmless," one might say, "so I hope you will steer clear of it. That said, I don't have the power to make this choice for you. It's something you'll decide for yourself." Parents who feel inclined to make rules about e-cigarettes could add, "If we find out you're using them, there will be repercussions." We serve our teenagers best when we remind them that all choices come with consequences, just as we parent most effectively when we remember that our teenagers will always have choices. It's not always easy to engage our teenagers about the dangers they face. But adolescents care what their parents think and take fewer risks when we keep the lines of communication open. In discussing dicey choices with adolescents, there are many ways to get it right. And one of those ways is to be sure that we are talking with, not at, them. Lisa Damour (@LDamour) is a psychologist in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and the author of "Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions Into Adulthood." Enhanced Village Vehicle Sticker Enforcement Coming: All residents who own a motor vehicle or any person having control or use of a motor vehicle owned by a resident of the village are required to annually obtain a village vehicle license for each motor vehicle used on any public street. A motor vehicle is any vehicle subject to the registration requirements of the Illinois Secretary of State. During the month of October, police department personnel will be conducting enhanced enforcement to ensure residents have purchased and properly displayed their village stickers on vehicles parked in town. Stickers now cost $62.50. Senior citizens may purchase one reduced price sticker per household for $32.50*. * Please note that senior rate stickers may not be purchased online. Vehicle license stickers may be purchased online at www.lagrangepark.org or in person at the Village Hall Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Special Announcement: LOCAL POLICE UNVEIL ONLINE SYSTEM FOR OVERNIGHT PARKING La Grange, La Grange Park, and Western Springs Police Departments from La Grange, La Grange Park, and Western Springs, in close cooperation with the Lyons Township Area Communications Center (LTACC), are pleased to announce a new online overnight parking registration system for residents. Using public safety software available through Frontline Public Safety Solutions (Frontline PSS), residents can now request online overnight parking in accordance with local municipal ordinances. Frontline PSS provides a user-friendly, easily-accessible, and secure way to register a vehicle for overnight parking on Village streets. The overnight parking module allows users to create entries of authorized vehicles and their specific locations, and this information becomes available in real-time to patrolling officers - saving both time and resources. This online, public portal not only simplifies the process for overnight parking in La Grange, La Grange Park, and Western Springs, it also provides an effective means for Police Departments and LTACC to more effectively share and manage the data associated with these requests. In addition to the new online system, residents of each Village can still call in overnight parking requests to LTACC at 708-352-2059, or to their local Police Department's non-emergency number. For more information on Frontline PSS, or to register your vehicle for an online overnight parking pass, visit your local Police Department's Frontline PSS website: La Grange: www.frontlinepss.com/lagrange La Grange Park: www.frontlinepss.com/lagrangepark Western Springs: www.frontlinepss.com/westernsprings CONTACT: La Grange La Grange Park Western Springs Deputy Chief Andy Peters Deputy Chief John Strezo Deputy Chief Dan Albrecht apeters@villageoflagrange.com jstrezo@lagrangepark.org dalbrecht@wsprings.com 708-579-2333 ext. 2257 708-352-7711 ext. 210 708-246-1800 ext. 167 www.villageoflagrange.com/police www.lagrangepark.org/188/police www.wsprings.com/police

Enhanced Village Vehicle Sticker Enforcement Coming: All residents who own a motor vehicle or any person having control or use of a motor vehicle owned by a resident of the village are required to annually obtain a village vehicle license for each motor vehicle used on any public street. A motor vehicle is any vehicle subject to the registration requirements of the Illinois Secretary of State. During the month of October, police department personnel will be conducting enhanced enforcement to ensure residents have purchased and properly displayed their village stickers on vehicles parked in town. As of Monday, October 1st, stickers will cost $62.50. Senior citizens may purchase one reduced price sticker per household for $32.50*. * Please note that senior rate stickers may not be purchased online. Vehicle license stickers may be purchased online at www.lagrangepark.org or in person at the Village Hall Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Stay Informed Through Village Messaging Services!!!!!! As this week's Boil Order has shown, it is important for Village representatives to be able to quickly notify residents of rapidly evolving situations occurring in town. La Grange Park offers residents CodeRED high speed telephone emergency notification services. This system enables Village and Lyons Township Area Communications Center (LTACC) officials the ability to deliver pre-recorded emergency telephone notification/information messages to targeted areas or the entire Village at a rate of up to 60,000 calls per hour. The CodeRED system not only offers faster calling rates and improved message delivery, it gives individuals and businesses the ability to add their own phone numbers directly to the system's telephone database. Please note that such systems are only as good as the telephone database supporting them. If your telephone number is not in the database, you will not be called. If you are not in the CodeRED database but would like to be added, click here to register: https://public.coderedweb.com/CNE/en-US/BFB7CC4C6C0A If you do not have a computer and would like to sign up for this service, please contact Secretary Shelley Johnson at (708) 352-7711, ext 203, and she will gladly register you on your behalf. If you have friends or family who do not currently receive the Police Department's Safety Brief but want to, please have them e-mail Secretary Shelley Johnson at sjohnson@lagrangepark.org to request being added to the contact list.

BOIL ORDER LIFTED

BOIL ORDER IN EFFECT FOR ENTIRE VILLAGE. More information below.

Saturday, October 27, 2018 is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Residents are encouraged to drop off unused medications at the La Grange Park Police Department lobby on 10/27/18 from 10 am - 2 pm. This event is made possible through assistance provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Coalition for a Drug Free Lyons Township.

We're Hiring!!! The La Grange Park Police Department will be accepting completed employment applications for the position of Police Officer from September 17, 2018, through November 16, 2018. There is no cost to apply for this position. Hiring requirements include the following: United States citizenship A high school diploma or equivalent A minimum of 60 hours of course credit from an accredited college or university A valid driver's license At least 21 years of age by the application closing date and under 35 years of age as of the posting of the initial eligibility list unless otherwise provided by 65 ILCS 5/10-2.1-6 No felony conviction(s) per preliminary Criminal History Check Binocular vision correctable to 20/20 Application packets may be picked up in person at the La Grange Park Police Department front desk at 447 N. Catherine Avenue, La Grange Park, Illinois, 60526, weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Completed packets must include the following items: A completed Application for Employment form A signed Authorization to Release Information and Waiver form Transcript(s) documenting required college/university course work (copies are acceptable) PLEASE NOTE: Packets must be returned by 4:00 p.m. on November 16, 2018, to be considered. Applicants must also complete preliminary testing for Municipal Registry Certification prior to submitting their completed application packets by the November 16th deadline. The Registry will confirm applicant certification with the La Grange Park Police Department. To scheduling testing, applicants should contact: Municipal Police and Fire Registry Conrad and Associates 930 York Road, Suite 18 Hinsdale, Illinois 60521 (630) 920-0571 Those who meet employment criteria will continue in this process with an orientation and written test to be administered on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, at 6pm. in the lower level of the La Grange Park Village Hall, 447 N. Catherine Avenue. A photo I.D. will be required to check in prior to testing, which should take approximately 2 hours to complete. Once written exams are completed, candidates with the highest scores on the eligibility list will be scheduled for oral interviews with our three-member Board of Police Commissioners. Oral interviews will consist of a series of scenario-based questions. Upon completion of oral interviews, a final eligibility list will be established and retained for two years. Recruit Officers will be selected from this list and are subject to polygraph, psychological, and medical exams (including vision testing, spinal examination, and drug screening) prior to enrollment in Police Academy Training. Questions or requests for additional information should be directed to Shelley Johnson, Secretary to the Chief of Police, at (708) 352-7711, ext. 203.

Adopt-A-Cop Program: The La Grange Park Police Department's Adopt-A-Cop program began in 1999 as a means for providing elementary school-aged children in our community with positive, non-threatening opportunities to learn more about our police officers. It was felt that more could be done to enable students to realize that police personnel are not merely "enforcers" and to highlight the human side of our profession. In this rewarding program, officers are "Adopted" by specific classes as their chosen officer for the upcoming school year. Each month, these officers spend 30 minutes with their respective classes and share information on age-appropriate topics, including: Anti-bullying awareness and conflict resolution skills Anti-drug and tobacco messaging Bike and pedestrian safety Following school rules Halloween safety Police equipment lectures and station tours Respecting others and their property Stranger Danger The benefits of this program are many, and include: Increased relationship-building between students and officers Positive role-modeling for students Officers gain greater appreciation for the challenges faced by teachers and administrators School faculty and staff learn more about their local police department We are proud of the success our Adopt-A-Cop program has enjoyed since its inception. In 2000, it was recognized by Cook County Crimestoppers and the Chicagoland Area Chamber of Commerce with the Public Sector Award as an innovative community crime prevention program.