Belgrade Police Department

  • Agency: Belgrade Police Department
  • Address: 417 Washburn Avenue, Belgrade, 56312 MN
  • Chief: Osvaldo Carbajal (Chief of Police)

Belgrade Police Department is located at 417 Washburn Avenue, Belgrade, 56312 MN. The Chief of Police of the department is Osvaldo Carbajal. The Belgrade Police Department phone number is 320-254-8282.

Belgrade Police Department News

Today is Election Day.

Guess who is going to State!! BBE Girls Volleyball Team!!

News Release

Congrats BBE Girls Volleyball!!!

Only 1 crash over night....

Officer Landyn is on Patrol today! Have a safe Halloween. Look for Belgrade PD or FD member for your treat tonight.

*** Tanker Truck has been removed, Store is open, east side is closed off while emergency crews work on a power pole that was struck. ******

Stearns County’s Most Wanted

Found Dog on School St. Belgrade.

Help Paynesville PD get a grant money to help pay for the K-9 Program. Vote online!

Know anyone that could use a winter wear? Stop in at Brooten City Hall.

*****Owner Found******* Found Dog! Call Belgrade PD if you are the owner! If you would like to foster this dog for a couple days, let us know. Nice male dog!

Thank You to Stearns County Sheriff’s Deputies, their K-9's (Aspen and Freddy), Stearns Dispatch, Pope County Sheriff’s Office, MN State Patrol, Belgrade Fire Department and Brooten Fire Department for assisting with locating Gavin today. It was a great ending to a scary situation! It was great to see everyone come together to work as a team to accomplish finding Gavin and getting him back to safety!

********FOUND SAFELY*********Juvenile has been located!!!********* Attention Brooten Area. Gavin has wondered away from the Brooten Elementary area. If you see him call 911. Please stay out of the area while we look for him. Thank You!

Part-Time Police Officer The City of Belgrade is currently accepting applications for a part time Police Officer. Applicants must be able to meet minimum qualifications of the position description and be able to perform all tasks described in job description. Officers are responsible for patrolling communities of Belgrade and Brooten. Starting salary is minimum of $16.50/hr. Applicants must be post licensed or eligible to be licensed at the time of application. Application, position description and release forms are available at Belgrade City Hall, 417 Washburn Avenue, Belgrade, MN 56312. Application deadline: 12:00 p.m., Oct 26th, 2018. Resumes’ will not be accepted in lieu of completed applications. All forms must be completed and submitted with application. Application must include: Cover letter, Resume, application, and supplemental questions. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Can obtain application by emailing Belgradepolice@co.stearns.mn.us or calling 320-254-8282. Posting will also be on the City Website at www.BelgradeMN.com Faxed or e-mailed applications will not be accepted. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

The BBE Color Run is about to get started. If your in the area watch out for run/walkers!

Officer Engfer graduates from DARE Instructor School tomorrow morning. It was a 2 week schoolin Iowa, in which she had to teach what she learned to a class there. (Pictured Below) She will be teaching the program to the Brooten Elementary School 5th graders through out the year.

We are continuing to get calls on this. It is a scam. Let your elderly loved ones know that don’t have facebook. The real IRS will NOT call you! Don’t give them any information!

78 UNBUCKLED MOTORISTS KILLED LAST YEAR IN MINNESOTA Click It or Ticket: Extra Sept. 17-29 – Seventy-eight people. That’s three classrooms full of students. That’s an entire NFL football team and their staff. That’s how many unbuckled motorists were killed last year in Minnesota. To remind motorists that seat belts save lives and it’s the law to buckle up, Belgrade/Brooten Police Department, along with more than 300 law enforcement agencies across the state, will be participating in the statewide Click It or Ticket campaign Sept. 17-29. The Department of Public Safety Office of Traffic Safety coordinates the extra enforcement and education campaign. Join the Crowd Most Minnesotans are making the life-saving decision to buckle up. According to the 2018 Minnesota Seat Belt Survey, 92.4 percent of front seat occupants are wearing their seat belts. Unfortunately, that means more than 7 percent of motorists continue to risk their lives and the lives of those in the vehicle by failing to buckle up. For those not choosing to buckle up, the results are tragically hurting families across Minnesota. • There were 1,215 life-changing injuries in 2017 due to unbelted motorists. • In 2017, 76 percent of the unbelted deaths occurred in Greater Minnesota (outside the seven-county metro area). • In 2017, 32 percent of all motor vehicle deaths involved unbelted occupants, compared with 30 percent in 2016. • Children are paying with their lives if they are not in proper car seats. From 2013 – 2017 in Minnesota: o 18 children (ages 0-7) were killed in motor vehicles and only nine of the victims were known to be properly secured (5 were not properly restrained, and restraint use was unknown in 4 fatalities). o Of the 83 children (ages 0-7) seriously injured in motor vehicles, only 47 percent of the victims were known to be properly secured. “We’ve heard the argument, ‘It should be my choice to buckle up, “But before you decide not to wear that belt, think of those children who didn’t have the choice to live without their mother or father. Or the spouse who will raise their children on their own. All because someone made the selfish choice to not wear their belt. You can’t choose who else is on the road with you, but you can choose to protect yourself by buckling up.” Speak Up about Buckling Up An unbelted motorist can crash into a windshield and get thrown into other passengers. Oftentimes, an unbelted occupant is ejected from the vehicle and killed. Drivers are in charge of their vehicles and the safety of their passengers. They can refuse to start the car until every passenger is belted. Passengers can also speak up if the driver is endangering everyone in the vehicle by not buckling up. The Law is for Safety Minnesota law states that drivers and passengers in all seating positions must be buckled or seated in the correct child restraint. Officers will stop and ticket unbelted drivers or passengers. Seat belts must be worn correctly — low and snug across the hips, and shoulder straps should never be tucked under an arm or behind the back. Minnesota Child Car Seat Law and Steps • In Minnesota, all children must be in a child restraint until they are 4 feet 9 inches tall, or at least age 8, whichever comes first. • Rear-facing seats - All infants and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car seat until they have reached the height and weight limits allowed by the car seat manufacturer. It is safest to keep children rear-facing up to the maximum weight limit of the car seat. • Forward-facing seats with harness - Toddlers and preschoolers who have reached the height and weight limits of the rear-facing car seat should use a forward-facing seat with harness until they reach the weight limit of the harness allowed by the car seat manufacturer. • Booster seats - For school-age children who have reached the height and weight limits of the forward-facing seat. The booster must be used with a lap and shoulder belt. • Seat belts - For children over 8 years old or have reached 4 feet 9 inches tall. It is recommended to keep a child in a booster seat based on their size rather than their age. Your child is ready for an adult seat belt when they can sit with their back against the vehicle seat, knees bent comfortably and completely over the vehicle seat edge without slouching, and feet touching the floor. Toward Zero Deaths The Click It or Ticket seat belt enforcement and education is a component of the state’s Toward Zero Deaths (TZD) program. A primary vision of the TZD program is to create a safe driving culture in Minnesota in which motorists support a goal of zero road fatalities by practicing and promoting safe and smart driving behavior. TZD focuses on the application of four strategic areas to reduce crashes – education, enforcement, engineering, emergency medical and trauma response and everyone.

BELGRADE PD- MONTH OF AUGUST CALL NUMBERS ATTEMPTED ENTRY 1 ALARM 1 ANIMAL COMPLAINT 1 SEXUAL ASSAULT 1 AGENCY ASSIST 13 PERSONAL ASSIST 1 BIKE/STOLEN 1 CITIZEN CONTACT 4 CIVIL MATTER 1 CRASHINJ ACCIDENT WTIH INJURIES FIRE AND AMBULANCE ENROUTE 1 CAR SERVICE 2 DANCO VIOLATION 1 DOG COMPLAINT/BARKING 3 DOMESTIC 2 DOMESTIC IN PROGRESS 1 DOOR CHECK(S) 1 DWI DRUNK DRIVER ARREST 2 FOUND PROPERTY 1 CRIMINAL FOLLOW UP 1 FOLLOW UP 8 HARASSMENT COMPLAINT 1 MATTER OF INFORMATION 3 MOTORIST ASSIST 5 MEDICAL EMERGENCY 12 ATTEND MEETING 3 NO PAY CUSTOMER 1 OFP VIOLATION 1 OPEN DOOR 2 PREDATORY OFFENDER FAIL TO REGISTER 1 DRUGS-PARAPHERNALIA/POSSESSION OF 1 SPECIAL DETAIL 5 STOLEN VEHICLE 1 SUICIDE THREAT 1 SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE 3 THEFT 5 TRAFFIC STOP 55 VANDALISM 1 VANDALISM TO VEHICLE 1 VERBAL DISPUTE 1 WARRANT ARREST 3 WELFARE CHECK 2 EXTRA PATROL 3 TOTAL 159

Minnesota Crime Prevention Association’s Crime Prevention Tips Topic: Back to School Safety Tips Riding the Bus School bus transportation is safe. In fact, buses are safer than cars! Even so, last year, approximately 26 students were killed and another 9,000 were injured in incidents involving school buses. More often than not, these deaths and injuries didn't occur in a crash, but as the pupils were entering and exiting the bus. Remember these safety tips: • Have a safe place to wait for your bus, away from traffic and the street. • Stay away from the bus until it comes to a complete stop and the driver signals you to enter. • When being dropped off, exit the bus and walk ten giant steps away from the bus. Keep a safe distance between you and the bus. Also, remember that the bus driver can see you best when you are back away from the bus. • Use the handrail to enter and exit the bus. • Stay away from the bus until the driver gives his/her signal that it's okay to approach. • Be aware of the street traffic around you. Drivers are required to follow certain rules of the road concerning school buses, however, not all do. Protect yourself and watch out! Walking and Biking to School Even if you don't ride in a motor vehicle, you still have to protect yourself. Because of minimal supervision, young pedestrians face a wide variety of decisions making situations and dangers while walking to and from school. Here are a few basic safety tips to follow: • Mind all traffic signals and/or the crossing guard -- never cross the street against a light, even if you don't see any traffic coming. • Walk your bike through intersections. • Walk with a buddy. • Wear reflective material...it makes you more visible to street traffic. Riding in a Car • You might have heard before that most traffic crashes occur close to home ... they do. • Safety belts are the best form of protection passengers have in the event of a crash. They can lower your risk of injury by 45%. • You are four times more likely to be seriously injured or killed if ejected from the vehicle in a crash. • Everyone needs to be buckled up properly. That means older kids in seat belts, younger kids in booster seats and little kids in child safety seats.

Minnesota Crime Prevention Association’s Crime Prevention Tips Topic: School Success, Parental Involvement and Truancy - 160,000 children skip school every day because they fear being attacked or intimidated by other students. - The U.S. Department of Justice states that 37% of all students don’t feel safe at school. - National Institute of Health reports that a third of students in 6th to 10th grades nationwide experienced some kind of bullying. Safety in our schools has been the focus of much research and keeping kids in school is the goal for parents, school staff and law enforcement. Truancy is one of the most significant predictors of future criminal activities. Regular attendance in school is the best way to ensure that our children have the best education they can to become successful and productive adults. Studies have shown that children who are truant from school are more likely to be unemployed, rely on public assistance, and engage in criminal or delinquent behavior. Therefore, truancy affects not only the child, but also the overall health and safety of the community. Additional research has shown a strong correlation between the level of education and the average annual income. There is no single cause for truancy. Research has shown that often times truancy is an indicator for more serious underlying problems such as alcohol or chemical use, family problems, physical or mental health issues, peer pressure, gang involvement, or child neglect. Whatever the cause may be, it is important for the child that the problem be identified and addressed as quickly as possible. Parental involvement is a key factor in helping children succeed in school. Parents are encouraged to talk to their kids about school, get to know their friends and make sure they attend conferences, sporting events or other activities that their children participate in. Communication between parents and teachers is important too. Checking in with teachers periodically via telephone or email is a great way to gauge how a child is doing in school. Volunteering in a child’s classroom, lunchroom or other part of the school is another option for those parents whose schedules allow it. Parents must also support school staff and law enforcement in tightening security in schools. Depending on the area, that may mean supporting: - Code of Conduct - Use of Metal Detectors - Random Locker Checks - Drug Detection Dogs - On-Site School Liaison Police Officer

Move over if you see lights!