South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division (SCDNR)

  • Agency: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division (SCDNR)
  • Address: 1000 Assembly Street,, Columbia,, 29201 SC
  • Chief:
Phone: 803-734-3833
Fax:
Email:

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division (SCDNR) is located at 1000 Assembly Street,, Columbia,, 29201 SC. The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division (SCDNR) phone number is 803-734-3833.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division (SCDNR) News

** See the results from the 2018 "Whistling Cock" survey and learn how you can volunteer to help with future survey efforts for bobwhite quail on the SCDNR website. **

** TBT with South Carolina Wildlife magazine ** 1980 marked the 50th anniversary of the Carolina Wren being named South Carolina's state bird, and SCW's editos celebrated by putting this fantastic piece of artwork by Joseph Byrne on the front cover. January 2019 will mark the 65th anniversary of the Palmetto State's favorite outdoor magazine. Spread the word … and make sure your subscription is up to date … as we gear up for this important milestone and a very special issue of South Carolina Wildlife. Visit us online at:http://www.scwildlife.com/

** What Is It Wednesday ** I am found all over the state. Declines in my numbers in the late 1940s prompted a restocking program beginning in 1951 and ending in 1989. Because all 642 of me were not brought in from other states, my genetic integrity was retained. I have 2 colors of coats: in the warmer months, I have a reddish coat where the hair is thinner and the colder months, I have a blue-grey-dusky brown coat with thicker hair. My tail has white and you can see it when I’m bouncing away. It is where I got my name. The photo? Well, only a male will have these and they’re shed from December to February. What am I? Photo and question by SCDNR biologist Pam Corwin

** Youth Raccoon Hunt this Weekend ** Youth raccoon hunts sponsored by the S.C. Coon Hunters Association (SCCHA) and participating regional clubs and chapters will begin in October and continue throughout the fall and winter, culminating with the South Carolina Youth Raccoon Hunting Championship, hosted by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR). Come out and support these young sportsmen and women as they compete for top honors and scholarships. The top two hunters in each age bracket (Juniors: 12 and under, and Seniors: 13-17) and the Sportsmanship Award winners in each age group will qualify for the state championship hunt. Bench show at 4 p.m. and hunts begin at 6 p.m. October 20 - Black Creek Coon Hunters Association Hunt Address: 1924 Cashua Ferry Road (Highwy 34), Darlington, SC 29150 (near the fire department) More info. at: http://www.dnr.sc.gov/news/2018/oct/oct3_raccoon.html

From nature sketching to a winter birding trip, we just added our fall Coastal Exploration Series events to Facebook. These are free events, but space is limited and registration is required (and does not open until 30 days out). If you're looking for a fun way to explore the outdoors this fall, consider signing up for one! Click on "Events" on the left-hand navigation. Photo: Allison Bowden (who's teaching our nature photography course at Botany Bay Plantation next month!)

The Weekly Shot! This shot of the 2017 solar eclipse taken at Lake Murray was chosen for the the gallery display in the "Scenic" category at the 2018 South Carolina Wildlife magazine-Hampton Wildlife Fund photo contest. Photographer: Tarina Weese Want to see your best shot on "The Weekly Shot?" Or maybe on display at next year's Palmetto Sportsmen's Classic in Columbia? You'll find contest entry info. at: http://www.scwildlife.com/photocontest/index.html And for more great photography and interesting stories related to the Palmetto State's natural resources, subscribe to SCW: http://www.scwildlife.com/index.html

** Another great outdoor adventure brought to you by SouthCarolinaWild.org ** USC college graduate Jacob Hamill discovers that it is one thing to learn about archaeology and the process of fieldwork in the classroom and in labs, but it is another thing entirely to experience an excavation in person. If you’re a college, high school or middle school student who loves to hunt and fish, hike or paddle, South Carolina Wild would love to hear from you! Whether you’re traveling or have some time between exams, send us your outdoor experiences, and selected adventures will appear on this website to share with your peers. Your photos or stories may even be published in South Carolina Wildlife magazine!

Read about the hunting opportunities available on SCDNR-managed dove fields and the role those places play in the research and management of our most popular game bird!

** TBT with South Carolina Wildlife magazine ** For the September-October issue in 1978, Phillip Jones' lovely shot of mist on the early morning waters of the Catawba River at Landsford Canal State Park was graced the cover of SCW. January 2019 will mark the 65th anniversary of South Carolina Wildlife magazine. Spread the word … and make sure your subscription is up to date … as we gear up for this important milestone and a very special issue of South Carolina Wildlife. Visit us online at:http://www.scwildlife.com/

** Information about the 2018 Wild Turkey Summer Brood Survey is aavailable now on the SCDNR Website! ** Visit: http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/turkey/2018BroodSurvey.html

** What Is It Wednesday ** You have to have a saltwater fishing license to catch me! My large and rounded dorsal and anal fins are located close to my tail fin which gives the appearance that I have 3 tails (hint, hint). My body shape makes me resemble a freshwater crappie. As a juvenile, I can change colors to match my habitat. I have an unusual behavior where I float on my side near objects. It helps me look like a floating leaf or debris. If you’re fishing for me, I’m pretty hard to catch and require patience and skill. You can find me near floating debris especially Sargassum. What kind of fish am I? Photo by John Fuss; question by SCDNR biologist Pam Corwin

** DNR News: SCDNR Recognizes Top Law Enforcement Officers for 2018 ** The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) recently honored its Regional and Statewide Officers of the Year for 2018 at an October 5th banquet and ceremony in Columbia. Lance Corporal John “JP” Jones of Islandton was named SCDNR Statewide Officer of the Year. Read more at https://bit.ly/2A2GvzX Photo: S.C. Department of Natural Resources Conservation Officer John 'J.P.' Jones (center) was presented with the agency's top honors by SCDNR Director Alvin Taylor (left) and Law Enforcement Division Deputy Director Col. Chisolm Frampton (right) at an awards ceremony held October 5th in Columbia. [SCDNR photo by Taylor Main]

** Upstate Bat Enthusiasts ** Be sure to tune in to WSPA Televison at around 7:30 a.m. on Thursday morning (October 12) to hear SCDNR bat biologist Jennifer Kindel talking bats with meteorologist Christy Henderson and Lynn Watkins from the Greenville Zoo. They'll be promoting the Zoo's ‘What’s Up With Bats?’ Community Workshop, planned for Friday, Oct 12th, from 6 - 8 p.m. This class is held at the Greenville Zoo and is appropriate for families with children ages 5 and up. Register at: http://www.greenvillezoo.com/279/Community-Workshops And don't forget to "Be a Bat Hero" when we celebrate Bat Week October 24-31! http://batweek.org/ ** Cool Bat Facts ** • The Brazilian free-tailed bat if the fastest flying mammal on earth! • Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight. • A single bat can consume 75 mosquito sized insects in just 5 minutes. • Bats provide an average annual pest suppression service worth an estimated $115 million to South Carolina's agricultural industry.

SCDNR biologist Christy Hand has spent the past five years in South Carolina salt marshes trying to learn more about the black rail, a little-studied marsh bird. 🐦 Led by Hand, SCDNR technicians and staff from partners such as the Nemours Wildlife Foundation, Clemson University, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's Charleston office conducted surveys and research throughout the coastal portion of the state. 🐦 Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife has used some of the data they collected – along with information from many other states – in their decision to propose federal protections for this species under the Endangered Species Act. 🐦 Learn more: https://www.fws.gov/southeast/wildlife/birds/eastern-black-rail/ (Photo: Christy Hand/SCDNR)

The Weekly Shot! This shot of a great-looking pointer doing its thing on a Chesterfield County bird hunt was chosen for the the gallery display in the "Recreation" category at the 2018 South Carolina Wildlife magazine-Hampton Wildlife Fund photo contest. Photographer: Susan Griggs Want to see your best shot on "The Weekly Shot?" Or maybe on display at next year's Palmetto Sportsmen's Classic in Columbia? You'll find contest entry info. at: http://www.scwildlife.com/photocontest/index.html And for more great photography and interesting stories related to the Palmetto State's natural resources, subscribe to SCW: http://www.scwildlife.com/index.html

** Learn more about Bats with SCDNR Biologist Jennifer Kindel ** On Wednesday, October 10th, from 7-8 PM, SCDNR biologist Jennifer Kindel will be giving a talk on White Nose Syndrme (WNS) in bats as part of the Greenville Zoo Conservation Lecture series. https://greenvillezoo.com/199/Conservation-Lectures On Friday, October 12th, from 6-8 PM, Jennifer will again be at the Greenville Zoo for their ‘What’s Up With Bats?’ event. During this community workshop participants will learn about bats of South Carolina, and each family will also build a bat box to take home. This class is held at the Greenville Zoo and is appropriate for families with children ages 5 and up. For more information, contact Karen Love at (864) 467-5731. Register online at: http://www.greenvillezoo.com/279/Community-Workshops

** Boating Safety Zone for the Waccamaw and Great Pee Dee Canceled ** On Saturday (October 6, 2018), the U.S. Coast Guard and the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) announced a new update canceling previously issued emergency “Safety Zone” orders limiting boating traffic along portions of the Waccamaw, Black and Great Pee Dee rivers and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. USCG Marine Safety Information Bulletin # 40-18 Update-3 (see attached image) cancels the previously issued temporary safety zone(s) on all waters of the Waccamaw River along the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from Winyah Bay to the Little River Swing Bringe, all waters of the Sampit River, all waters of the Great Pee Dee River from Winyah Bay northward to the Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge, and all waters of the Black River from its junction with the Great Pee Dee northward to U. S. Highway 701 Bridge. MSIB 38-18 regarding the Socastee Swing Bridge closure is still in effect until further notice. However, it is important to note that there are still numerous areas of abnormally high water, as well as extensive damage to docks and homes, throughout the flooded areas of the Pee Dee and Upper Coast. It is imperative that boaters in these areas keep a good lookout and maintain a safe speed that does not create wake that will do further damage in areas where high waters persist. The SCDNR would ask ALL boaters in these areas to please slow down and have extra concern for the people along these waterways who are still dealing with high water and property damage. REMEMBER: Boaters are responsible for the wake cast by their vessel (and any damage caused by that wake) at ALL times.

** SPECIAL from SouthCarolinaWild.org ** Brooks Taylor writes about his internship with the SCDNR’s archaeology team . . . and a unique opportunity to unearth human remains on the coast of South Carolina. If you’re a college, high school or middle school student who loves to hunt and fish, hike or paddle, South Carolina Wild would love to hear from you! Whether you’re traveling or have some time between exams, send us your outdoor experiences, and selected adventures will appear on this website to share with your peers. Your photos or stories may even be published in South Carolina Wildlife magazine!

** Help SCW Celebrate Sixty-Five Years of Conservation Success ** For nearly 65 years, South Carolina Wildlife magazine has been bringing the best of the Palmetto State's outdoor traditions right into your living room with beautiful covers like this this one from our November-December 1980 issue, featuring a gorgeous painting by artist David Maas. This year, why not start a new outdoor tradition by giving the gift of a South Carolina Wildlife subscription to the young sportsmen and sportswomen in your family? Orders for regular or gift subscriptions received through December 16, 2018, will include this very special commemorative issue. The subscription rate has been reduced to only $15 through December 2018. Or you may gift a subscription to family and friends for the extra-low price of only $12! Subcribe at: http://www.scwildlife.com/subscribe.html

** Successful Gopher Tortoise Release ** At the S.C. Department of Natural Resources' Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage Preserve, scientists and technicians from a number of differnt organizations, including UGA's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Columbia's Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, the Longleaf Alliance and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have been working on a long-term project to restore populations of gopher tortoises to this unique landscape, where acres of restored longleaf pine habitat sit atop the ‘Edisto Ridge,’ a geographic feature that provides exactly the type of deep sandy upper layer of soil that these tortoises need. On September 27th, another group of juvenile tortoises "headstarted" by the staff at Riverbanks after being hatched at SREL were released onto the preserve. Radio Transmitters will allow SCDNR staff to monitor the tortoise's progress and provide important insights into the life history of these fascinating creatures, once common in this part of the state before farming and timbering altered the landscape.

🎉🎉 Congratulations to SCDNR Officer PFC Randy Hering of Georgetown, pictured below receiving the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council Officer of the Year Award with SAFMC Vice-ChairmanMel Bell, Director of the SCDNR Marine Division's Office of Fisheries Management and SAFMC Chairman Jessica McCawley. 🎉🎉 [Please note: an earlier version of this post mis-identified Ms. McCawley.] Read more about this award, anounced in July, on the SCDNR's News Updates web page at: http://www.dnr.sc.gov/news/2018/jul/jul27_officerawarded.html

Tomorrow, October 6th, is the October Big Day! A day where everyone is encouraged to go bird watching to capture the wonder of fall migration! Whether you spend 10 minutes in your backyard or all day exploring a new location, record your sightings using the eBird Mobile app or website. When you submit your bird observations to eBird, this information is incorporated into our own database for use by SCDNR researchers and conservationists to help better understand birds. Visit https://ebird.org/news/october-big-day-6-october-2018 to learn more about this event and how easy it is to participate!

** TEMPORARY HUNTING CLOSURES WILL EXPIRE OCTOBER 4th ** The temporary hunting season closures that were put in place for portions of the Pee Dee and Waccamaw River drainages following the widespread and catastrophic flooding in the wake of Hurricane Florence will expire at 11:59 pm on Thursday, October 4th, 2018. The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) will not extend this closure beyond October 4th. Hunting may resume in these areas beginning Friday, October 5th. Keep in mind that some Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) still have public access closures or vehicular access restrictions. WMA hunters should check the SCDNR website for an updated list of those property closures and restrictions on SCDNR-managed properties. (See link below.) Although some areas are still affected by flood waters, most game species have had opportunities to disperse and adjust since the flooding began two weeks ago. The SCDNR reminds hunters that there may be isolated areas where game species are still vulnerable or are in a stressed state following the flood. As always; please respect our natural resources, act in an ethical manner and practice good sportsmanship when going afield. http://www.dnr.sc.gov/

Did you know that October is South Carolina Archaeology Month? The Arkhaios Cultural Heritage and Archaeology Film Festival is one of many events happening to celebrate, and you are invited to attend. This three-day festival, sponsored by SCDNR Heritage Trust Program, will take place at Richland Library Main in Columbia from October 12-14. Come enjoy this free, family-friendly event and learn about archaeology around the world, including right here in South Carolina! Visit http://www.arkhaiosfilmfestival.org/ for more information.

** SCDNR News Release: Boating Safety Zone along South Carolina coast modified ** On Wednesday (October 4, 2018), the U.S. Coast Guard and the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) announced an update to previously issued emergency “Safety Zone” limiting boating traffic along portions of the Waccamaw, Black and Great Pee Dee rivers and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. USCG Marine Safety Information Bulletin # 40-18 Update-2 adjusts the area where permission is required for boat travel to include “all waters of the Waccamaw River along the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW) from Sandy Island north to the Socastee Swing Bridge (AICW statute mile marker 390 to AICW statute mile 370). USCG and SCDNR officials have determined that high-water conditions have improved enough along previously restricted waterways outside of the above areas such that regular boat traffic can resume. Those areas include "Winyah Bay, Sampit River, AICW south of Sandy Island, AICW north of Socastee Swing Bridge, Great Pee Dee River and Black River." However, it is important to note that there are still numerous areas of abnormally high water, as well as extensive damage to docks and homes, throughout the flooded areas of the Pee Dee and Upper Coast. It is imperative that boaters in these areas keep a good lookout and maintain a safe speed that does not create wake that will do further damage in areas where high waters persist. The SCDNR would ask ALL boaters in these areas to please slow down and have extra concern for the people along these waterways who are still dealing with high water and property damage. REMEMBER: Boaters are responsible for the wake cast by their vessel (and any damage caused by that wake) at ALL times.